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Why Doctor Who is a MESS - NitPix

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00:00   |   Apr 03, 2019

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  • Get your NitPix clothing at NitPix.co.uk. We’ve now got new genie and the boy white
  • sweatshirts and we’ve made everything a bit cheaper. Follow me on twitter for a chance
  • to win one for free! We’ll even cover shipping, which is international baby.
  • Doctor Who has been my life for the last 5 months. Ever since series 11 aired in October,
  • I have been obsessing over this science fiction baby show. Full hours, days and weeks staring
  • at my Television Screen. Basking in the doofy costumes, low-budget sets and bad dialogue.
  • I watched all of Who for this video and I mean all of Who.
  • All so I could be resolute in my judgement that the new season… isn’t good.
  • But first let me give you some context, in 2016 I made a video calling out the new Doctor
  • Who showrunner Chris Chibnall. It got a million billion views, and everyone loved it. I went
  • on the H3 Podcast, YouTube Rewind and I was officially crowned a Doctor Who prophet. People
  • flooded my mailbox writing “you were right! You were right about Chris Chibnall! This
  • new season is all wrong! It’s all wrong!”
  • But listen, this is what Doctor Who consistently does. It changes. Every couple of years it
  • reinvents itself like teenager with daddy issues “this is the new me mum! I wear black
  • and drink crows blood now! It’s not a phase. IT’S NOT A PHASE.” and that’s what one
  • comes to expect with Doctor Who. For over 50 years it’s regularly brought in an all
  • new team of producers, actors and writers. But the fanbase response to every single small
  • change is often one of frustration, anger and distrust.
  • Everyone involved in the making of Doctor Who since the 80s has been hated by some group
  • of people somewhere and hey so have I, I have hated Doctor Who as much as the next fan.
  • I have squealed and tantrumed about the place like a lost baby man. But eventually I always
  • come around in some degree.
  • But this time, when I finished season 11, I didn’t feel angry, I didn’t tantrum
  • and whine, I felt... sad, and I didn’t know if it was the content or if I’m just…
  • old now. I didn’t know if I was just another stubborn Doctor Who fan unwilling to accept
  • change due to my own personal bias or if I was right about Chris Chibnall all along.
  • To figure this out, I went through all of the shows history, to try and discover what
  • it is about Doctor Who that always kept me there despite the fact that so often in my
  • life I complained about it.
  • So what I’m going to do in this video is unpack all of season 11 and tell you everything
  • that I don’t like about it, and then I’m going to tell you why that doesn’t really
  • matter.
  • But I haven’t just been watching Doctor Who for the last 5 months. I’ve mostly been
  • playing RAID: SHADOW LEGENDS. It’s the newest and freshest mobile RPG, with hundreds of
  • champions to collect and customise, a storyline which I could only describe as PENG JUICE,
  • PVP battles, BBB battles and 3D graphics which are so good, you will start conflating the
  • game with reality. This portable gamage is priceless, because RAID: SHADOW LEGENDS is
  • absolutely bloody free and the Juice doesn’t stop flowing because once you sign up, you
  • can take part in the Special Launch Tournament and win in-game prizes. So I guess in a way…
  • RAID really is reality… so support the nitpix boys, help us get bread by going to my description
  • and downloading RAID now through my links to get 50,000 silver immediately AND a free
  • EPIC CHAMPION as part of the new player program.
  • But yeah… I’ll go back to… talking about… Doctor Who now…
  • Let me take you back to the swinging sixties, TV shows looked like this and they sounded
  • like this. None of these shows had any money, and none of them were good. But there weren’t
  • any armchair critics like me to moan about the mise-en-scene, tonal consistency or narrative
  • structure. Everyone just watched them and were happy with what they were given, because
  • in the 60’s everyone just entertained themselves with dumb shit like sticks and racism.
  • Sydney Newman was a Canadian producer who was working as the head of Drama at the BBC.
  • He had an idea about an old man travelling in time and threw money at Verity Lambert
  • to make it. The BBC in the 60s was a powerful institute with a lot of talent behind it,
  • they were able to design a pretty neat looking spaceship along with an iconic theme tune.
  • Hell yeah!
  • The first Doctor Who story is one where the doctor and his companions go to the stone
  • age and interact with cave people for a bit. I’m not even kidding, absolutely nothing
  • happens in it. But like I said, all of TV was bad back then, it’s not like they could
  • switch the channel and watch something more interesting.
  • After spending time hanging out in the stone age, the Doctor and his companions get into
  • the Tardis and pop to a different planet in the future, it’s here they come across The
  • Daaaaaaaaaaleks (say in a strange way) - a race of alien Nazi’s that want to murder
  • anything that isn’t them. This scared the absolute shit out of everyone and it made
  • Doctor Who a household name in the UK, forcing tonnes of young impressionable sixties kids
  • to ‘’hide behind their couch’’ which… by the way did anyone else’s parents who
  • watched doctor who say they ‘’hid behind the couch’’? because… mine did, and
  • I know lot’s of people who’s parents have told them that… like… what the fuck is
  • that about? Who hides behind a couch? Surely you’d just hide behind your pillow or something,
  • and aren’t couches mostly up against the wall anyway- *Knoking sounds* -hang on a sec
  • *open’s door* ‘’FBI PUT YOUR HANDS DOWN NOW YOU SUNOFABITCH!-‘’
  • Because the Doctor can travel anywhere from a school in 1963, to the stone age, to an
  • alien planet in the far future, the writing staff were only limited by the budget at that
  • time. Within the first three months of the shows origin, it was clear that the quality
  • of the show was infrequent. Every time someone sat down to watch a new Doctor Who story,
  • they had no idea if they’d be getting a tightly scripted piece of science fiction
  • masterwork or something that was boring as fuck.
  • Doctor Who carried on for three years, maintaining its popularity and continuing with its hit
  • or miss mentality. As the years went by, the writers, production staff and most of the
  • cast members were replaced. The Doctor would frequently swap out his companions, as often
  • as I change out the piss bucket that’s under my bed… which is a lot.
  • The only person who couldn’t be swapped out was William Hartnell, the actor who played
  • the Doctor. The straining filming schedule was taking a toll on his health. The show
  • was a national hit, but they couldn’t have Doctor Who without The Doctor.
  • It was here that Sydney Newman came up with another genius idea. He was quoted as saying:
  • “Hey guys, this Doctor guy is an alien. Let’s just make him change his face! CHANGE
  • HIS FACE! CHANGE HIS FACE! CHANGE IT CHANGE IT CHANGE IT CHANGE IT! CHANGE HIS FACE!”
  • This was the missing ingredient necessary to make Doctor Who immortal. It would continue
  • for a further 2 decades. The role of the doctor cycled through 8 different actors and the
  • writers introduced new aspects such as The Sonic Screwdriver, a nifty device that opens
  • doors, operates technical devices and anything else the script needs it to do, Galifrey,
  • The Doctor’s home planet, Time Lords, the people who live on Galifrey and The Master,
  • The Doctor’s arch enemy, who’s also a time lord.
  • But how did Doctor Who stay on air for such a long time? Well, I’ll tell you. It was
  • because it had the ability to adapt and change. In the 70s it took inspiration from the science
  • fiction show ‘Quatermass’ and in the 80s it took more of an inspiration from ‘Star
  • Wars’. As audience expectations of television changed, Doctor Who changed with it. From
  • the very inception of the show, it’s ownership had never been weighed on a single auteur,
  • it’s ownership shifted from Robert Holmes to Douglas Adams to Jon Nathan Turner.
  • Jon Nathan Turner was 16 when Doctor Who first aired and was a big fan of the show for much
  • of his early life. He got a job working on the show in the 70s and worked his way up
  • for ten years until he got the top producer position. As a fan of the show, he had a strong
  • opinion on where Doctor Who had gone wrong and proceeded to make huge changes.
  • The fans, who had sat through the best and the worst of Doctor Who for the last 20 years
  • were now more entitled. They were the only people that knew how good Doctor Who could
  • be, so when inevitably, the ratings diminished, and the budget was slashed, fans were quick
  • to criticise Jon Nathan Turner. One of those people, was Chris Chibnall, aged 19 in
  • this clip.
  • As the show continued to drop in ratings, fans began to worry about the shows longevity.
  • The song ‘Doctor in Distress’ was produced in a bid to keep the show running. This mesmerizing
  • harmony of soft vocals was sadly not enough to stop Doctor Who from
  • being cancelled 4 years later.
  • The fans festered like prison wine for over a decade, writing fan scripts and fan books
  • and fan audio dramas, a group of Doctor Who fans even made a Fan film with long-term fan
  • Paul McGann.
  • But in that 16-year gap, TV had changed. Television now had ‘Showrunners’, auteurs that would
  • oversee all the creative aspects of the show. Like David Chase would for The Sopranos, David
  • Simon would for The Wire and Joss Whedon would for Firefly.
  • Though Jon Nathan-Turner is seen as the man behind Doctor Who in the 80s, he never wrote
  • a single episode, he just sorta shaped it. He didn’t have much control over the show
  • though, as he was forced to fire Colin Baker and was always jumping through hoops to appease
  • the BBC.
  • For the first time in Doctor Whos history, a single auteur would step in and take control
  • of both the writing and production of the show. In 2005, big boy malloy Russell T Davis
  • stepped in, brought Doctor Who back from the ashes and made everyone love it again. We
  • went through a re-birth of The Doctor, The Daleks, The cybermen, The Master, they were
  • all birthed out in glistening High Definition by one huge Doctor Who fan. And just when
  • Doctor Who had been restored to the height of its popularity, he bowed his head and left
  • the world of Who.
  • It was here that Stephen Moffat took over as showrunner. He was known in the UK for
  • Sherlock and for writing some of the best episodes of Who in Russell’s era. Under
  • Moffat’s guidance, Doctor Who was modernised for a second time, the scale was upped and
  • the show gained international appraise. Including a new fan base from across the pond.
  • But after making 6 seasons of Doctor Who, Moffat decided to move on and do other things
  • with his life. The next in line for the Doctor Who throne was Chris Chibnall, the creator
  • of Broadchurch. Chibnall was tasked with reinventing and modernising Doctor Who for a 2018 audience
  • and… It came out 5 months ago.
  • Similar to Chris Chibnall in 1986, many 19-year-old white boys are upset about these new Doctor
  • Who episodes. Doctor Who still exists largely on an episode by episode basis and these episodes
  • will either be a hit or a miss for you personally. There are fans out there that love every episode
  • unconditionally and power to those people. But these new Chibnall episodes are considered
  • by many, myself included, to be entirely misses. But if you’d like to see how I rate each
  • episode of Doctor Who since it came back in 2005, I’ve put up a video on my second channel
  • where I go through all of them.
  • But surely these new episodes can’t be that bad? It’s still a time travelling alien
  • in a blue box using a magic wand to fight men in rubber costumes. How much worse can
  • it possibly be?
  • LET’S FIND OUT.
  • The most important day in any Doctor Who showrunners life is their first episode. This is their
  • pitch to us, the audience. It lays out the groundwork for what we can expect from their
  • vision of Who. It’s essential to get right if you want to lessen the inevitable onslaught
  • of a fanbase who all think they can do it better than you, both Russel T Davies and
  • Moffat understood this and pulled out some major peng juice in the episodes ‘Rose’
  • and ‘The Eleventh Hour’.
  • These episodes masterfully introduce the characters, tone and genre. In ‘Rose’ we are introduced
  • to… Rose. An average 19-year-old London girl, going about her day in these quick punchy
  • edits which allow us to piece together the type of life she leads.
  • Everything’s pretty normal until she’s asked to go down to the dark dingy basement.
  • Tension builds as we see shop mannequins start to slowly move. As they stagger towards the
  • frightened vulnerable Billie Piper, it looks like she’s done for. But then, at the last
  • minute, a cheeky northern man in a leather jacket grabs her hand and saves her. Boom!
  • The Doctor with a companion, running away from science fiction monsters, all while exchanging
  • snappy witty dialogue. This is Russell T Davies pitch for Doctor Who, it’s his vision of
  • the show in a nutshell and we’re only five minutes into the very first episode.
  • It’s concise and to the point. The relationship between The Doctor and Rose is the focus of
  • this episode and the emotional crux of the whole season.
  • 13 years later, Chris Chibnall has a crack at establishing his vision of Who. It opens
  • with Ryan Sinclair vlogging on his YouTube channel. Finally, a Doctor Who companion that
  • I can relate to. A humble British YouTuber. But Bro, what kind of YouTubing are YOU doing?
  • ‘RyanS’ What kind of terrible name is that? You need to work on your branding! You
  • just uploaded a video called ‘Hey’? You could have made that a LOT more clickbait.
  • How about “MY NAN FELL OFF A CRANE AND DIED – STORYTIME/IPHONE GIVEAWAY’. That will
  • get you views.
  • But I don’t know why I’m even giving this YouTube N00b advice anyway, it’s not like
  • he ever does YouTube again ever. It’s just a really convenient narrative device to have
  • Ryan speak directly to the audience. Similar to what Russell wrote in Love & Monsters.
  • But it’s even worse here, because Ryan isn’t even the sort of lad to have a YouTube channel.
  • He doesn’t seem to have any interest in filmmaking or storytelling or vlogging, he’s
  • a pretty shy guy who works in a warehouse.
  • Ryan explains to us that he’s a pretty smart, capable guy but can’t ride a bike yet. This
  • is because he has dyspraxia, a condition which gives him bad coordination. But Ryan isn’t
  • the only companion, there are an additional three characters that need to be introduced
  • before we meet the new Doctor. So quickfire!
  • We got Grace, Ryan’s nan, who’s so nice that you really hope she won’t fall off
  • a crane.
  • Graham, And, erm very nice guy. He’s Grace’s second husband and really wants Ryan to call
  • him grandad…
  • And lastly we’ve got Yaz. Yeah she’s nice, nice as well. She used to study at school
  • with Ryan and is now a filthy PIG. But she wants to do more than just handle parking
  • disputes… I don’t quite know what she wants. Murder cases maybe? Arson? Stabbings?
  • Like what are you 22? Walk before you run y’know?
  • So that’s everyone introduced and it’s time to “get on with the plot”, Ryan goes
  • on a rager because he can’t ride a bike, and throws it off a cliff, his grandparents
  • go home without him. But poor Ryan gets more than what he bargained for when, upon searching
  • for his bike he comes across a big, pink, cold… fig.
  • So he does what any old geezer would do and calls the rozzers, which is convenient for
  • Yaz because now she gets to do more than just deal with parking disputes. They look at it
  • a bit together and go ‘ooh this is odd’.
  • But before they can finger the fig any further, Ryan gets a phonecall from Grace and Graham.
  • Their train has mysteriously stopped and out of the darkness they see a glowing tentacle
  • alien, which is conveniently linked with this mysterious fig, but something that’s also
  • convenient for them is that the doctor also conveniently falls into the same carriage
  • as them, conveniently placing herself directly in front of old tentacles here, thank GOD,
  • because only GOD himself could manifest all these coincidences. You could call that bad
  • writing, but isn’t that all of life really? Just a series of complex incomprehensible
  • coincidences that lead you to the present moment. I don’t know who you are or why
  • you’re watching this video, you could have gone through some sort of tragedy, a break-up,
  • maybe but whoever you are, it all comes down to a series of unpredictable moments that
  • propel you into the present. No matter who you are, that’s what it comes to, and here
  • we both are, in the present, sharing in our mutual, bitter curiosity about Doctor Who…
  • so anyway let’s compare that to how Moffat introduces his vision of Who.
  • In ‘The Eleventh Hour’, the doctor crash lands in Amelia Pond’s garden. Little Amelia
  • goes to investigate and out springs the 11th Doctor. Matt Smith. The last time we saw the
  • doctor interacting with a kid like this was… The Girl in the Fireplace… For whatever
  • reason no other writer wanted to write scenes where the Doctor interacts with children.
  • The Doctor investigates a mysterious crack in Amy’s bedroom but then he has to leave
  • to stop the Tardis from blowing up.
  • When he comes back, it’s been years and Amy is all grown up. She thought The Doctor
  • was her imaginary friend. She calls him ‘Raggedy Man’, because he’s wearing the ragged
  • costume of the tenth doctor. The Doctor calls her ‘The Girl Who Waited’, this is just
  • something Stephen Moffat likes to do. He gives his Doctor Who characters poetic titles. That’s
  • his style, the man’s got style.
  • Moffat paints the Doctor as an imaginary friend to the new companion, he’s a man unlike
  • any other, an ancient magician that sees beauty within the fabric of the universe. We are
  • first introduced to the character through the eyes of a child, he makes her laugh, makes
  • her feel safe and he leaves her spellbound. The Doctor shares in her childlike whimsy
  • and it sharply contrasts against the brooding David Tennant and Christopher Eccelston, who
  • may have had issues connecting with children.
  • Viewers will always approach a new season, with a new Doctor with a sense of caution.
  • We get attached to a certain actor playing the role in a certain way and when someone
  • new comes in it’s very easy to turn our noses up in disgust. Moffat makes sure to
  • give Matt Smith plenty of time to showcase his acting chops.
  • We see him testing out his new tastebuds, joking with Amy, delivering techno babble
  • and interacting with his environment. Before the major conflict of the episode starts,
  • we have an understanding of what type of character he is and are fully on board with Moffat’s
  • vision of the eleventh Doctor.
  • Whitaker’s doctor is not given this same type of space. She is introduced right amidst
  • conflict. She has just regenerated and crashed down to Earth, similar to the Eleventh Doctor.
  • However instead of having a time to chill out, get her bearings and get to know her
  • new companions, she spends the entire episode running from set piece to set piece.
  • “The Doctor works best when he’s running around solving loads of problems at the same
  • time” NO CHIBNALL NO.
  • We’ve gone from a series of scenes which feature gritty Sheffield social realism to
  • a woman falling thousands of feet from the sky through the roof of a train. She gets
  • up immediately and grabs a hanging electrical tube and stabs the CGI tentacle monster with
  • it. That makes it dormant for ten seconds, it then wakes up again, gives them all a shock
  • and then leaves. The doctor then proceeds to ask everyone loads of questions.
  • “You ask a lot of questions, Morty. Not very charismatic, it makes you more of an
  • underfoot figure.”
  • The Doctor asks if anyones seen anything else weird tonight, and Ryan and Yaz know what’s
  • up, that weird fig thing from earlier… So they drive all the way back and it’s vanished.
  • Where’d the fig go? Well this guy has it and he films it and stares at it a bit. Oh
  • Chibby you really know how to build up a mystery, I’m on the edge of my seat.
  • When we cut back to the Doctor, they’re in a completely different location and the
  • Doctor faints because that’s what the doctor tends to do right after regenerating. I think
  • it’s so the writers can have scenes where the companions discuss at length whether they
  • should trust the doctors new face or not. But Russell and Moffat chose not to do this
  • with their first doctors because when you’ve got people that have never met the Doctor
  • before… there’s nothing really to talk about.
  • The third Doctor, played by Jon Pertwee was asleep for almost a whole hour before he got
  • up and did anything. But then when he does wake up, he sneaks around the UNIT base, pretends
  • to be a showering soldier and then when no one’s looking he steals some clothes, steals
  • a car and then this is his first real bit of dialogue
  • as the third doctor.
  • What a fucking nutter. Within a few minutes the Doctor is introduced as a character that’s
  • intelligent, cunning, devious, childish and assertive.
  • The 13th Doctor wakes up from her sleep and immediately launches straight into shouting
  • the plot at her baffled companions. Notice how they seem uncomfortable, confused,
  • scared. We as an audience don’t feel any warmth towards this new doctor because we
  • are seeing her from their perspective.
  • In ‘Rose’, after the initial conflict is over there is a calmer period in which
  • the 9th Doctor, played by Christopher Eccleston does some light investigating. He visits Rose’s
  • apartment and meets her mum. These interactions allow you to grasp what his sense of humour
  • is like, his general disregard for social norms and what excites him. Russell uses a
  • tool to characterise the Doctor that Chibnall has entirely overlooked. Comedy.
  • My Mother once told me that if you want to someone to like you, make them laugh. Also
  • painstaking nit-pick science fiction shows made for a family friendly audience.
  • Russell and Moffatt use comedic dialogue to characterise their doctors and it makes us
  • as an audience warm to them like a piping hot cup of Joe. When Chibnall writes for the
  • Doctor, the jokes are lukewarm tepid cups of vomit.
  • The Doctor explains that they’ve all been injected with DNA bombs, by that tentacle
  • thing, the DNA bombs will re-write their DNA completely and kill them in ten minutes. Only
  • joking there’s no countdowns in this one boys, Chibnalls over countdowns. The bombs
  • can go off at any moment but for some unknown reason they haven’t yet. The Doctor tracks
  • the signal back to the tentacle monster and they all leave to find it. That’s the end
  • of the scene. It’s entire purpose is to explain all of the plot to get them to the
  • next scene. The scene is surface level and has no depth to it.
  • But this Doctor Who we’re talking about, it’s hardly The Wire. How much depth can
  • you expect a scene in Doctor Who to have? Well, in Stephen Moffat’s ‘the eleventh
  • hour’, the 11th doctor realises there’s been an alien fugitive living in Amy’s house
  • for over a decade. The prison guards are going to destroy the earth if he’s not taken back
  • into custody within an hour. The Doctor, with no Tardis or sonic screwdriver is stuck in
  • a village in the middle of nowhere.
  • But instead of focussing on the plot, the scenes are focussed around the relationship
  • between the doctor and Amy Pond. As they walk through the village it becomes clear that
  • Amy has had an obsession with The Doctor since she was a child. The doctor launches into
  • techno babble, but the scene isn’t really about that, the scene is really focussed around
  • how these people react to seeing the manifestation of Amy’s imaginary friend come to life.
  • The doctor is completely oblivious to this subtext which adds further depth
  • to the scene.
  • Then suddenly the doctor gets a eureka moment when he sees an orderly taking photographs
  • of a man and his dog instead of the massive eye of Sauron staring down at earth from space.
  • He realises he can save the planet and is about to launch into action, but Amy is having
  • none of it and handcuffs him to a car and demands to know who he is.
  • Amy is a hot headed Scottish woman, she has grown impatient with the Doctor shrugging
  • away her questions and acting as if she’s not in the room. She is overly emotional and
  • is forthright and demanding. She’s an active protagonist and isn’t happy being ordered
  • around by The Doctor. Chibnall writes his companions as flawless
  • passive sycophants. Not a single one ever clashes with The Doctor, they barely even
  • argue amongst themselves. It’s hard to have distinct characters when everyone always agrees
  • with each other. Everyone is always in the right and everyone’s always really nice.
  • You might be thinking that Rose Tyler was an archetypal Mary Rae Sue, but she would
  • often argue with the doctor or make mistakes.
  • Companions are important. They’re the characters we personally relate to in a Doctor Who story.
  • They’re knowledge of the universe fits in with our own and they serve as a narrative
  • tool, they’ll ask questions about their environment which produces expository dialogue,
  • they’ll often ground a story more in reality as their contemporary attitudes and ideals
  • will contrast with the science fiction genre and they’ll often act as the moral compass
  • for the Doctor, questioning what’s right and what’s wrong.
  • The Doctor is hyper-intelligent, immortal and a time-traveller. It’s hard to feel
  • any genuine tension when the leading character is so OP. It’s the companions that are emotionally
  • and physically vulnerable and it is them who we connect with. The emotional stakes are
  • judged not through the large scale visual effects but by the level of conflict that’s
  • exerted on the companions. When Russell T Davis brought back in Master in season 3,
  • he takes over the planet and murders 10% of Earth’s population. But what gives the episode
  • high emotional stakes is that Martha Jones family are kidnapped and tortured for a year.
  • We’ve never seen Martha challenged and tested this much before and is a great example of
  • how companions provide that much needed emotional anchor in an episode of Doctor Who.
  • In Chibnalls vision of Who, the Doctor talks to all three of her companions in exactly
  • the same way. She’s warm to them, she’s kind and she humours their questions. But
  • there’s a lack of intimacy, I never understood what she genuinely likes about them or why
  • she enjoys travelling with them. This first episode was dying to have a scene in which
  • The Doctor gets to know them on a personal basis, something that made her friendship
  • with these three normies tangible and genuine.
  • But instead of developing the core characters, Chibnall’s priority is in developing the
  • half-baked plot of his first episode. As we watch this rando stare at this huge fig some
  • more. When it does open up, some power ranger looking geezer crawls out and stomps over
  • to the rando and he’s all like ‘what happened to my sister’, and then the Alien that was
  • in the fig kills him.
  • But I know what you are asking, tentacles? Power ranger boy? DNA bombs? What the fuck
  • is happening here?!
  • Well one of Graham’s mates calls him up and tells him about some shady electric shit
  • that’s going on up on this building. The Doctor and her crew get there and discover
  • the tentacle alien isn’t actually an alien at all but more of a bio organic data collecting
  • McGuffin. It holds the data of one of the guys from the train erlier… y’know…
  • this guy. This data has been collected for the Power Ranger guy who’s name is Tzim
  • Shaw. Tzim Shaw is basically doing a predator thing where he’s been sent to Earth to hunt
  • a human and if he does he becomes king of the power rangers.
  • He turns up on the roof and starts saying he should kill the doctor and his crew, but
  • he doesn’t. He just gives them all the exposition we need to thread these loose and lacklustre
  • ingredients together. Never mind that it seems like a shitty test for a warrior race to go
  • through, since they plow through humans like I plow through your mum, yeah that’s right
  • I fucked your mum. All that shit I was sprouting out earlier about coincidences and us being
  • bound together by a mutual interest in Doctor Who was just all bullshit to make you like
  • me. I fucked your mum.
  • Tzim Shaw absorbs all the intel from the bio tentacle squid robot and teleports away Cubeman
  • style, after his target, who literally seems like a person I could beat the shit out of.
  • So now it’s time for the big finale and it’s all on this crane because Tzim Shaw’s
  • target works as a crane driver. He has low self-esteem and he’s all alone. It’s the
  • loneliness of the tower crane driver, so isolated, so distant from reality, a nobody, looking
  • down at the ants below.
  • The doctor confronts Tzim Shaw again and after a bit of a scuffle she reveals that when he
  • scanned that tentacle monster earlier he absorbed everybody’s DNA bombs because she put…
  • the DNA bombs… In the tentacle thing… with her screwdriver… and he absorbed the
  • DNA bombs… when he absorbed the data and he didn’t know. He was tricked! He was tricked
  • by the doctors… cunning.
  • So he’s filled with DNA bombs and he teleports away just as the bombs are going off. Ohh
  • maybe he’ll come back later in another episode. Maybe Tzim Shaw will be a universally loved
  • and acclaimed Doctor Who villain. Because he’s just such a well-conceived and interesting
  • antagonist.
  • Ryan’s grandmother, Grace is up climbing the crane and she’s trying to stop the squid
  • from hurting people and she falls off the crane and dies. There’s a funeral, which
  • must have happened immediately after because the Doctor is invited to it despite not really
  • knowing her very well.
  • Then the doctor buys her outfit from a charity shop and then she tries to teleport to her
  • Tardis on her own but instead she accidently teleports everyone in the room to the middle
  • of space. That’s the cliff-hanger we end on.
  • This episode could have been made a lot tidier if it cut out all the fat and made the narrative
  • components simpler. If you want to do a story about an alien warrior that needs to hunt
  • a specific person, why choose this rando crane driver? Why not go for Ryan, Yaz or Graham.
  • Follow a terminator structure with the Doctor act as a protector for the target, constantly
  • evading danger and trying to figure out the mystery as to what’s happening. When you
  • start involving DNA bombs, giant pink figs and a sub-plot with this guy and his sister,
  • you’re just wasting valuable time and cluttering the story with crap.
  • Or why not make Tzim Shaw’s target Grace? That way her death would be more tragic and
  • wouldn’t seem like something that could have been easily avoided. It would have made
  • Tzim Shaw a more threatening villain and her death would have had a stronger emotional
  • impact on the audience.
  • The Doctor is a highly empathetic character that takes the responsibility for protecting
  • the people they care about. The Doctor failed when she let Grace die, yet this is never
  • something she feels guilty for and there’s never any blame put on the Doctor by Grace’s
  • close family. As the episodes continue, the Doctor will smile and promise to keep people
  • safe, but at no point do any of her companions say “What about Grace? She wasn’t safe.”.
  • Graham is the most prominent and consistent family member Ryan has. Graham should feel
  • protective of Ryan’s wellbeing and should always want to keep him safe above all else.
  • But he sees travelling with the doctor as one big roller-coaster, never questioning
  • the safety of it and more than happy to see his grandson put in high risk situations.
  • If he was written as a character that actually cared about Ryan, it would create conflict,
  • it would create drama and it would make the characters more defined.
  • This is the foundation of the problems that you find with almost all of Chibnalls written
  • episodes. It’s a bunch of thread chasing with disappointing reveals which don’t carry
  • any impact or emotional resonance. There’s not enough character, there are no distinguishable
  • themes and the science fiction is boring.
  • But I know what you’re thinking. “nitpix are you going… are you going to look at
  • every episode of series 11 in a scene by scene sequence analysis? Are you going to do that
  • with all eleven episodes? Because honestly that feels quite boring.” no that’s not
  • what I’m going to do, I’m just going to do it for this one. The first one.
  • As I said earlier this is Chibnall’s pitch to us, his vision for Doctor Who. But I still
  • don’t understand what that is exactly. I don’t understand if Chibnall’s series
  • is lighter or darker in tone, I don’t know who these characters are and what makes them
  • different from anyone else on earth. I don’t understand why they like the doctor and vice
  • versa.
  • The Woman Who Fell to earth is an hour long, Rose is 45 minutes. With less time Russell
  • is able to establish 4 strong characters, give us a genuinely unsettling monster, establish
  • the Tardis and establish The Doctor as an enigmatic figure that is always accompanied
  • by death.
  • He’s able to fit all this into 45 minutes plus give us a cheeky monologue on top of
  • that. Now that is Peng Juice.
  • When Moffat introduces new companions, the guy goes full whack. He puts everything into
  • it. In Clara’s first episode as a companion, a plane is about to crash, so The Doctor and
  • Clara get into the tardis and materialise onto the plane and then stop it from crashing
  • and all of that is made to look like one shot.
  • Then in Calpaldi’s last season, he’s introduced as this legendary professor who’s been lecturing
  • at the university for decades. We have these amazing sequences where the Doctor gives lectures
  • about art, science and time travel.
  • So when one year later we’ve got this unambitious, dull, poorly thought through version of Doctor
  • Who, it just bloody depresses me. It’s like the show has been drained of fun, colour and
  • enthusiasm. But is Chibnall to blame? Or is the issue more to do with what’s in between
  • the Doctor’s legs?
  • The doctor has been a big old blokey bloke for a long time. Forever actually. Until now,
  • now he’s a woman, with a big old vagina between his legs, but that’s not a big deal
  • right? That won’t change anything right? Wrong! No! of course it will change things.
  • It changes lots of things!
  • Since its inception, the character of the doctor has been built around two personality
  • types which are typically associated with male traits. He’s either a charming romantic
  • flirty man who takes his companions on weird space dates, or he’s a slightly senile whimsical
  • grandfather, with a glint in his eye and the secrets of the universe on his shoulders.
  • Though each actor brought their own spin to this framework, these are the archetypes we
  • associate with The Doctor. But now the Doctor is female, these traditional versions of the
  • Doctor won’t work anymore and that’s a bad thing, right?... No of course not, you
  • sexist idiot! If anything it’s a good thing.
  • Doctor who as a show is fluid like a microwaved choccy doughnut. A donut that’s been microwaved
  • too much, so much so that it’s sloopy like gluten. Gloppy like glutoon. Gloopy Glue-like
  • gluten. That’s Doctor Gluten Who for you, nothing solid, nothing stable, it’s constantly
  • glu-glu-glutening. But changing the Doctors gender is probably one of the biggest changes
  • to date. This change was a great incentive to bring in new fans, as well as excite writers
  • with the possibility of a completely new set-up. This was a new way to define an iconic character.
  • I was especially excited after seeing how Moffat reinterpreted the master as a woman
  • for the first time. Missy is still an evil timelord, she’s still confident and manipulative,
  • but these aspects of her character have been re-instated in a new way. She’s less insane
  • than the original master, she’s more flirtatious and her relationship with the doctor is entirely
  • different. The Master’s motivation stops being one hell bent on domination and evil
  • schemes and instead becomes her trying to be a good person. The nature of the character
  • evolved, he embraced Missy’s inherent femininity and allowed the change of gender to genuinely
  • progress her character, without sacrificing her status within the Dr who universe. Moffat
  • didn’t just change the way The Master looked, her character was completely reinvented from
  • the ground up. However, the Master's gender change wasn't revealed until the end of her
  • first season, as a surprise twist. She had numerous scenes to build up to the big unmasking.
  • This wasn't something Chibnall could do with the shows central character.
  • When Jodie Whittaker was annouced as the thirteenth doctor, the fanbase were immediately split.
  • You had a side which smugly raised up their champagne glasses while sitting up on their
  • high horses, tooting about how progressive the show was to have a woman with a time womb
  • and there was an opposing side which screamed and cursed in agony at the idea of it all.
  • But after all the fighting and arguing online, series 11 feels like the direct result of
  • that split. In order to please one side, the Beeb made the doctor a woman. But in order
  • to not piss off the other side, they made her as uncontroversial as possible.
  • Whitaker’s Doctor as a whole, has less of an overall narrative focus than what we’ve
  • seen in previous seasons. This is partly due to the number of main protagonists in Doctor
  • Who doubling from 2 to 4 and that’s not even including all the bloody supporting characters
  • Chibnall seems to always clog his scripts up with. The attention is never really on
  • the doctor, she seems to always be in the background, nipping at everyone’s heels
  • and barely having any dominance in her scenes, this results in the doctor having far fewer
  • moments of brilliance.
  • But let’s break down the 13th Doctor as a character. She’s childish, she speaks
  • her mind in short quick sentences and she’s very easily excitable. Most of the humour
  • with her character comes from her being socially awkward. All these traits are commonly associated
  • with the Doctor, but it’s as if she’s been undercooked. She lacks the ego, the flair
  • for the dramatic, the wit, the flirtiness, the leadership, the broodiness and that tinge
  • of tragedy. Russell and Moffat built on the Doctor’s God complex and would often paint
  • him as a mythological protector that’s always accompanied by death. Chibnall’s vision
  • of the character doesn’t seem to have this same ambition for complexity. But does stripping
  • the Doctor of these traits make her character less compelling? Not necessarily, the show
  • is constantly being reinvented and I welcome a showrunner coming in and changing things
  • up. But there’s nothing new or game changing about the characterisation of the 13th Doctor,
  • the only thing that makes her different is her biology.
  • Chibnall hasn’t taken advantage of the Doctor’s new-found femininity in any way. It’s pretty
  • much ignored apart from the odd line here and there. It’s as if the Doctor is trying
  • to ignore her new gender, rather than embrace it as Missy did. If her womanhood had been
  • embraced in the writing process, we could have had an entirely new approach to the character.
  • I’m not saying that it SHOULD have been this way. However the doctor has always been
  • a gendered character, and displayed traits that coincided with his regeneration, not
  • just in relation to gender but age and even class as well. A female doctor could have
  • signified a new direction for the character to go in and that change in charactitersation
  • could have led to an entirely new approach to how she handles conflict. We could have
  • a doctor who's good at spying or assuming false identities. She could be depicted as
  • a germaphobe, finicky or easily grossed out by things. She could be written as materialistic,
  • sensitive or tactile, they could heighten her sense of empathy, even make it a part
  • of the doctors character to adjust to the change after being a man for so long. The
  • obvious idea is to make her more of a mother figure, to juxtapose the paternal role that
  • the doctor traditionally portrayed. The kind of mother who can murder shit with her sonic
  • screwdriver.
  • Television shows like fleabag or orange is the new black tackle female issues and embrace
  • the sociological differences that exist between genders as a strength. They show how femininity
  • can be grotesque, or violent or horny. The interactions, motivations and flaws these
  • female characters embody are different to the ones normally written for men. In modern
  • television, less and less does one come across female characters who are present to serve
  • simple functions like empowerment, or to simply give a male protagonist someone to save and
  • in fact there are tonnes of examples of this being present even in the past (i.e alien,
  • Juno, Young Adult, Frances Ha, Breakfast Club etc). It's such a shame that the first woman
  • to play the character of the Doctor, to be part of what is considered a British institution,
  • has been pushed into a less leading role, and seems to have been directed to interpret
  • her character as a less engaging middle ground between Matt Smith and David Tenant. Only
  • this time they have removed any of the character flaws which they possessed.
  • Even small quirky flaws which humanised The Doctor. Like often times, he'd talk to his
  • Tardis as if he was a guy who was way too into his car. It’s almost like… he wants
  • to put his dick in the console. I was interested in seeing how Chibnall would write a female
  • Doctor interacting with her Tardis. Would she still show that same slightly romantic
  • relationship? Or would her interaction be entirely different and new? How does a female
  • doctor engage with her sexuality? But it seems as though the doctor has lost it at this point
  • because… she just treats it like a piece of equipment… kinda boring really…
  • But the most important relationship in the Doctor’s life is the one with their companions.
  • As I said in the previous slide, Chibnall’s companions are happy little cucumbers, happy
  • to roll from set piece to set piece without any major conflict with the Doctor. This a
  • major problem, as conflict is the easiest path to characterisation and it makes the
  • relationships feel earnt and special.
  • For example, when Rose is in her second episode, she asks the Doctor questions about his background.
  • She asks about his race and where he’s from. But he just gets mad defensive.
  • Then the second act starts and it’s all action, Rose nearly dies, this tree woman
  • dies, The Doctor figures out skin flap’s evil plan and he saves the day. Then in the
  • epilogue for the episode, the Doctor and Rose go get chips, it’s here that he comes out
  • with his big secret. He’s the last of the time-lords. He tells her that there was this
  • huge war between the time-lords and the Daaaaleeeks, this war was called the Time War and all of
  • it happened off screen. The Doctor is the only one that survived and is the last of
  • his kind. We know he’s still suffering from the emotional fallout of the war, because
  • of his dutty behaviour from earlier. The scene is intimate. Rose has won over the Doctor’s
  • trust and their relationship has been strengthened. The Doctor has given Rose privileged information
  • about himself that he wouldn’t reveal to most people. Moffat does exactly the same
  • thing in Amy’s second episode. But Chibnall’s version of The Doctor has no secrets, nothing
  • personal to reveal, and her scenes with her companion’s lack that intimacy.
  • Instead of writing scenes that aim to better define the central character of the show,
  • the attention is put on developing the back stories of randos. In the Ghost Monument,
  • this guy even gets an entire monologue. All the Doctor gets is a scene where she tells
  • her new companions that she’s failed and that they’re all going to die.
  • Another thing that pisses me off is that the 13th Doctor will often randomly name-drop
  • dead celebrities she’s hung out with. Oh yeah those are clearly Pythagoras’s
  • pair of primark sunnies. These name drops don’t make her seem cool or interesting.
  • It just reminds me of my mate Derren who won’t stop mentioning that one time when he shared
  • a joint with Rupert Grint. Derren people will think you’re an impressive guy without mentioning
  • that experience. You have more value than that. Rupert Grint isn’t even all that.
  • I guess… at the core of it, I have always held a bitter jealousy towards all the female
  • and gay Doctor Who fans who lusted over Tenant, Smith and Capaldi’s dick. I was just…
  • really looking forward to being able to have my turn at objectifying the Doctor, but they
  • have made her so neutral, so broadly rounded to please the many, that I can’t even find
  • it in me to objectify her. I can’t even enjoy Whitaker on the basest level and I know
  • it’s definitely not her fault, because she is hella sexy in that Black Mirror episode
  • where she cheats on her husband. So all that I’m left to conclude in terms of how they
  • wanted to build Whitakers doctor is that… they didn’t have a bloody clue.
  • But you could argue that this season aimed to dial the doctor back a bit and instead
  • focus on social injustices. Some people have used this as a catalyst for claiming the show
  • has become too damn political. That’s it’s been taken over by the evil soy drinking falafel
  • wrap loony SJW left.
  • So now, here we are. Doctor Who has lost it all. It’s become entirely obsessed with
  • its political agenda and as a result, has lost any semblance of being a good show. JK,
  • Doctor Who has always been politically oriented and always to the left. There’s a whole
  • story with the 8th Doctor which criticises the racist attitudes of the Brits during the
  • 60s. But if that wasn’t enough, it also shows a civil war between black and white
  • Daleks. The White Dalek’s think they’re superior to the black daleks and the whole
  • time the Doctor and his companion go around talking about how bad racism is. This isn’t
  • anything new, and actually I expect it in my who. The Doctor’s agenda has always been
  • one of peaceful conflict resolution, protecting oppressed cultures and criticising any forms
  • of regressive opinions that are found throughout the galaxy.
  • But that’s not to say that this new season of Doctor Who has even made itself more political.
  • There are only around three episodes that you could argue have a social/political focus.
  • These are Rosa, Demon’s of the Punjab and Kerblam.
  • Chibnall’s third episode, ‘Rosa’, is co-written by Malorie Blackman, who wrote
  • the book series Noughts and Crosses. The Noughts and Crosses books are set in a parallel universe.
  • This 21st Century world is similar to our own, except race segregation is still prevalent.
  • This makes Malorie perfect for writing a Doctor Who episode featuring Rosa Parks, the first
  • lady of civil rights, the mother of the freedom movement and an activist who’s best known
  • for her pivotal role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott.
  • This episode is definitely one of the strongest in the season, as it’s not as covered in
  • Chubnall’s bland grubby fingerprints. All the scenes with Rosa Parks and Martin Luther
  • King are engaging and well-constructed. But more importantly, this episode dares to try
  • something new with the shows format.
  • In classic Doctor Who, the Doctor seemed to only want to travel with white people. For
  • the 26 years it was on television, the writers never thought to bring in a companion of colour.
  • I find this particularly strange, as the show frequently articulated messages of tolerance
  • and equality. It would have been controversial of course, but not as controversial as Uhura
  • in Star Trek. By the 80s, Doctor Who's viewers were in decline, the show needed to be modernised
  • and changed. The show was cancelled in 1986 and two years later Red Dwarf was aired on
  • BBC Two. This episodic comedy science fiction show became a cult classic and for many nerds,
  • it filled the Doctor Who shaped hole in their hearts. Half of the main cast were black and
  • the show wasn’t considered controversial or risky for its casting decisions. If they
  • had cast a black actor to play the doctor or one of his companions, if done properly,
  • it could have revitalised the show for a new audience.
  • It wasn’t until 2007 that The Doctor would travel with fan favourite companion Martha
  • Jones. But with this representation comes a slight hitch. Take her to the future, absolutely
  • no problems at all, they have a great time hanging out with cat people, but take her
  • to England in the 16th century and the locals there might not be as accommodating. Martha
  • is understandably concerned about this, but the Doctor shrugs it away and reassures her
  • that she's fine. Even though during this time period, Queen Elizabeth the first (who briefly
  • appears in the same episode) had publically said that Africans would be arrested and exiled
  • from England on sight.
  • But if this episode was historically accurate, everyone they met would be 5ft tall and reek
  • of shit. The brutal side of history is ignored for the sake of romanticising the thrill of
  • travelling with the Doctor. Moffat approaches racism in Doctor Who in the same way. In 'Thin
  • Ice' the Doctor and Bill go to 1814, it shows a multicultural London and it's asserted that
  • racism isn't something Bill should really worry about, sure it’s slightly alluded
  • to or maybe touched on a teensy bit, but new-who never really ran with historical realities
  • or made them a part of their show, which is a shame, as oppressive environments can be
  • more conducive to new types of conflict.
  • Chibnall's approach to his first historical episode is entirely different. In ‘Rosa’,
  • the Doctor, Graham, Yaz and Ryan accidently materialise in Montgomery, Alabama 1955. Upon
  • leaving the tardis, Ryan is racially assaulted, both verbally and physically. Whilst Russell
  • T Davies and Stephen Moffat shied away from discussing racism in Doctor Who head on, Chris
  • Chibnall and Malorie Blackman write an uncensored and realistic depiction of racial discrimination
  • in the 1950s.
  • However, the emotional impact of the scene is weakened by the meek response from our
  • protagonists. The Doctor is responsible for Ryan's safety and wellbeing but after the
  • assault, she just stands around awkwardly in the background and says "we don't want
  • any trouble." After this, Rosa Parks appears out of nowhere and handles the situation,
  • after the assaulter leaves, The Doctor fan girls over Rosa, who tells them to leave Alabama.
  • The Doctor scans Rosa with her screwdriver and starts giving exposition about artron
  • energy. There isn't any attention brought back to Ryan and everyone ignores the assault
  • even happened. Ryan shrugs the whole thing off, only seeming slightly frustrated.
  • Graham is also responsible for Ryan, he loves him as a grandson. But aside from rubbing
  • his face a bit, he doesn’t give him any emotional support. He never seems concerned
  • for Ryans wellbeing and is unmoved by this aggressive display of discrimination.
  • Ryan and Yaz are dehumanised further when they are kicked out of a restaurant and it’s
  • only here that the Doctor suggests that they wait in the Tardis. It’s as if she’s only
  • just realised this environment is hostile and dangerous for two of her close friends.
  • The episode focuses on Rosa Park’s involvement in the civil rights movement, but because
  • our protagonists are so detached and unmoved by these acts of intolerance, we as an audience
  • lack emotional investment in the narrative.
  • But with every historical episode of Doctor Who, there always comes an alien antagonist.
  • With Dickens there were ghosts, with Shakespeare there were witches and now with Rosa Parks
  • we have a time travelling space racist named Krasko. This geezer is from the far future
  • and has murdered over 2,000 people. He states that things started to go wrong when civil
  • rights were introduced to America and sets out on a dastardly plan to stop Rosa Parks
  • from performing her bus boycott, with the hope of changing history.
  • Krasko is so bland and uncharismatic, especially for a future racist responsible for the death
  • of 2,000 people. Any interactions with him and the protagonists simply play out as him
  • standing across from them giving a monologue about his plans to re-write history and then
  • vaguely threatening them. He’s unable to inflict pain on any living being because of
  • a neural restrictor in his brain. There is very little that makes him stand out as an
  • antagonist, he doesn’t really do a whole lot and when he does do something, it’s
  • off screen. For instance, he interferes with a bus so that Rosa Parks can’t get on it.
  • It cuts to a trashed bus and everyone’s like ‘oooh it must have been… they guy…
  • the greaser! From the future’. The blandness continues until Ryan shows up with a time
  • gun and sends that motherfucker back to the dinosaurs.
  • The science fiction aspects that make up this episode feel entirely half-baked. I know in
  • the past we’ve had werewolves, vampires and a giant wasp, and they are dumb, but it
  • always seemed like these creatures were directly informed by the environment they were in or
  • they served a larger purpose of celebrating and paying tribute to the historical figures
  • featured in them. The witches speak in a Shakespearean prose, Dickens door knocker forms a ghostly
  • apparition and Agatha Christie witnesses a series of murders in a country house, they
  • aren’t by any means good episodes, but the creatures felt like they had a presence, they
  • posed a genuine threat to the characters in that circumstance. They also have a unique
  • chemistry with the historical figures their interacting with and the post-modern nature
  • of it makes it feel like a satisfying piece of writing.
  • Krasko is entirely separate from the civil rights movement and aside from being a racist,
  • doesn’t help to articulate the hardships Rosa Parks had to go through or celebrate
  • the culture Rosa Parks was a part of.
  • In ‘Vincent and the Doctor’, the Doctor and Amy visit Vincent Van Gough. The antagonist
  • of the episode is a creature which embodies and represents Van Gough’s depression. We
  • connect with Vincent’s struggles and we learn about the historical period he lived
  • in.
  • At the end of the episode, the doctor takes Van Gough to present day London, to show him
  • how much his work will be appreciated and respected in the future. This all feels bitter
  • sweet as you, the viewer, still know that he will eventually take his own life. We aren’t
  • told what depression does to people; it’s never explained to us, we’re shown it in
  • an interesting, unique way. This blend of sci-fi playfulness and sadness are the sort
  • of tones that are particularly unique to Doctor Who. Much like in Rosa, they choose to celebrate
  • the historical figure with a pretty heavy-handed monologue at the end, in Rosa it’s performed
  • by the Doctor with them all standing around the Tardis looking at a tv screen. But in
  • Vincent and the Doctor it’s performed by Bill Nighy directly to the painter as you
  • watch the personal impact this has on Van Gough.
  • They also used Van Gough’s paintings to influence the cinematography and set design
  • of the whole episode, giving the episode a distinct and beautiful feeling. This level
  • of ambition was something Rosa would have really benefited from, as there are a ton
  • of great civil rights artists and photographers who could have acted as stylistic queues for
  • the episode. Ultimately Rosa ended up feeling like ‘just another doctor who episode’
  • when it could have elevated into a piece of drama that was considerably more standout.
  • All this episode really aims to do is inform us about Rosa Parks, that’s all it ends
  • up doing, never really wanting to explore any other themes or ideas that could have
  • come with this narrative.
  • ‘Demons of the Punjab’ suffers from the same problems. The episode’s central focus
  • is on India’s partition. This is an often underrepresented time in our history and Doctor
  • Who is perfect for capturing the political landscape and culture from a modern angle.
  • Yaz has Indian heritage and convinces the Doctor to take her back in time to meet her
  • Grandmother when she was young. The Doctor agrees and woooopp wooooop woooop they’re
  • in the Punjab.
  • Yaz is a third generation immigrant and has never even been to India before. It’s an
  • important part of her identity, but will she find more in common with her grandma than
  • differences? How are their lives different? Will Umbreen approve of Yaz’s modern and
  • western attitudes? Will Yaz connect with her families culture or will she miss her life
  • in Sheffield? Well strap in and prepare to have none of those questions answered. Thematically
  • this episode is about one thing, partition. How and why it happened, the conflict between
  • Muslims and Hindus and the effect partition had on millions of people.
  • This episode plays out more like an ITV historical drama, as opposed to a time travelling sci-fi
  • show. The Doctor and her companions feel more like narrative roadblocks preventing the depth
  • necessary from conveying this issue in an impactful way.
  • They arrive the day before partition and meet Yaz’s Grandmother, Umbreen. They’re surprised
  • to discover that Umbreen plans to marry Prem, a man who isn’t Yaz’s Grandfather. But
  • Prem’s brother Manish doesn’t approve, as their family is Hindu and hers is Muslim.
  • This story in and of itself could have worked. But they have to shove in a bunch of British
  • people constantly commenting to one another about what’s happening and then because
  • it’s doctor who they have to shove in some alien shit.
  • But theses creatures just turn out to be… entirely inconsequential to the narrative.
  • They’re passive aliens that just want to watch people die… Because their planet was
  • blown up?... It’s a pretty farfetched explanation for something that is essentially a red herring.
  • The scenes with the Doctor trying to outsmart them and figure out their plan is merely a
  • distraction put there to convince you that what you are watching is doctor who, instead
  • of an itv drama about partition… with pretty awful acting.
  • In the very first Doctor Who serials of the 60s, there were a number episodes that have
  • been dubbed ‘pure historicals’, these are historical episodes that have no science
  • fiction plot elements and instead focus entirely on creating conflict out of the more realistic
  • issues you could find yourself in as a time traveller. Both ‘Rosa’ and ‘Demons’
  • of the Punjab’ would have benefited from entirely removing the lame science fiction
  • elements and instead making their episodes revolve around the social political issues
  • of the respected episodes.
  • The writers of these episodes, Vinay Patel and Malorie Blackman are well qualified to
  • write about these historical events and social issues. You could not describe the approach
  • to the political aspects of these episodes as ‘virtue signalling’, as they are clearly
  • writing sincerely. But these people aren’t sci-fi writers and it shows. The science fiction
  • aspects feel forced and undeveloped. They are a bland detractor from the most interesting
  • parts of the episodes, which are the social political themes and messages. So, why not
  • bring back the pure historical? This would allow the writers to fully focus on building
  • a realistic, politically charged environment and allow them to create engaging stories
  • through that. But why would they want to get rid of the monsters? Don’t you know that
  • trying to break formula is fucking risky?! We could lose VIEWERSHIP YOU IDIOT!
  • But what about Black Mirror? Black Mirror is a British science fiction show that has
  • commented on social issues time and time again, the futuristic aspects of the show work hand
  • in hand with making us see our own reality reflected in a dystopian future. Doctor Who
  • will occasionally dip its toe into similar waters with episodes like ‘Smile’, ‘Bad
  • Wolf’ and ‘Gridlock’. Oh and there was an episode in the newest season that did that…
  • what was it called again… oh yeah…
  • Kerblam! Remember Kerblam? That one looked good. We all thought, hey “Chibby wib hasn’t
  • written it, those robos look pretty lit and there’s gonna some kind of social commentary
  • on Amazon’s working conditions.” What could possibly go wrong?
  • Oh shit they’re doing toy story 2.
  • Ever worked in one of those Amazon warehouses? Yeah, I didn’t think so... I DID. I had
  • to work two jobs to support my little squirt. Youtube and…
  • The amazon warehouse… Or, what we used to call it - the slaughterhouse. Day in, day
  • out. Wrapping up your deliveries. 200 deliveries an hour. A human conveyor belt, only permitted
  • half an hour breaks and given minimum wage. What is my purpose? Am I just another cog
  • in the machine? I have a voice.
  • I get home so exhausted I can barely stand, my son staring at The Dinosaur Project screaming
  • “Play it again! Play it again!” I have a voice. I have a voice. I’m sorry Charlie,
  • there’s no time to watch the dinosaur project because doctor who has made an episode about
  • the very problem that I am experiencing, taking down the titans at amazon and empowering me
  • as a worker, finally I. HAVE. A. VOICE.
  • So the episode gets off to a good start. The Doctor and her companions arrive at the kerblam
  • headquarters, after receiving a cry for help in a package the doctor ordered. The Kerblam
  • HQ is literally a planet, which holds the entire production line of Kerblam. The doctor
  • and her team apply as workers and split off into their different work areas, with the
  • doctor and ryan working the conveyor belt, graham in cleaning, and yaz in the warehouse.
  • From here we see the horrible working conditions which the people at Kerblam are put under
  • as each of the companions befriend a different worker at kerblam, you see the fascistic regime
  • that is enforced by these sinister kerblam robots and evil bosses. All the while the
  • workers are mysteriously disappearing; all these layers are built upon one another, and
  • given the history of this season, but also all of doctor who, you feel like this would
  • be an episode which would want to comment on the oppressive work regimes that have especially
  • been in the news recently. So I was pretty surprised when the twist is that it’s not
  • one of the workers who needs help but in fact the Kerblam system itself!
  • It needs help stopping a worker who is trying to program the delivery robots of kerblam
  • to send out explosive bubble wrap to civilians. This desperate act of terrorist is in order
  • to try to bring more rights and opportunities to human workers. You know… an understandable
  • response to the horrible working conditions which everyone is under. The Doctor manages
  • to save the day by blowing up all the robots, as well as murdering the worker advocating
  • for more rights. She gives the Kerblam bosses a slap on the wrist and they promise to try
  • and improve things at Kerblam so that this never happens again. Yep. Great moves doctor,
  • have faith in the people who rarely seem to show much care or empathy for their workforce
  • at all.
  • I understand that the antagonist of Kerblam was putting innocent lives at risk with his
  • bubble wrap plot of terror, but often the doctor is a character built on empathy and
  • will often resolve conflict without killing people. That’s why they don’t carry a
  • weapon with them, just a buzzing phallic device. In Kerblam, we can understand why this guy
  • is acting out, he’s reached the end of his tether; he’s young and just needs some talking
  • to. I find it really strange that the Doctor just cold heartedly off’s the kid without
  • even feeling bad about it.
  • Even though the Sci-fi elements of ‘Kerblam’ are all there and look good and feel good,
  • the messaging seems all off. Having the doctor working to protect a genuine system of oppression,
  • a system which isn’t far from slavery, feels so unlike Doctor Who.
  • Last year South Park aired an episode called ‘unfulfilled’, this episode looked into
  • the working conditions of Amazon workers and the societal role Amazon has in our day to
  • day lives. Kerblam could have easily made larger statements on the nature of consumerism
  • and capitalism. These people live on a factory planet; they work all day, just to send their
  • impoverished penniless families some money and they’re supposed to be thankful for
  • this job.
  • The last season of South Park consistently explored social/political issues from school
  • shootings, child abuse and anxiety. The latest season of Its Always Sunny in Philadelphia
  • explored Gender, Sexual Harassment and homosexuality. Issue focussed art is what’s popular at
  • the moment and that’s not a bad thing. Like any kind of art, it can be done in a way that
  • pulls your heart strings and leaves you feeling better informed about the modern world we’re
  • living in. A great example of this is a short three minute film that looks into the social/political
  • issues surrounding Article 13, made by, made by ME, WOW!
  • But just because your art is about something important, doesn’t make it good, or even
  • necessarily interesting. In a world where making art with a political point has found
  • its way into the mainstream, it is no longer enough to just raise these issues to our attention;
  • we’re being told about them constantly. You need to use form, and have genuine creative
  • ambition to find new and compelling ways to put these issues across. Otherwise you just
  • end up like most bad art… forgettable, and that’s the last thing doctor who should
  • ever be. However, it’s not the individual episodes that make this season suck; it’s
  • the whole bloody package.
  • Now in my first video I talked about how Chris Chibnall was a bad writer and after the release
  • of this season it’s pretty clear that not much has changed. He’s still a bad writer,
  • but being a showrunner is more than just writing. It’s designing and managing the entire season,
  • it’s overseeing every creative aspect of the show. Chibnall has final say on the decisions
  • surrounding the core characters, their arcs and the overarching narrative of the season.
  • But he also has producing obligations, from hiring writers, directors, set designers and
  • actors. The job of showrunning is to have an overall vision or tone for a show and being
  • able to communicate that effectively to everyone else involved.
  • A good showrunner is defined by how carefully and meticulously they build up the features
  • of their unique universe. This is what allows a show like Doctor Who to stand out.
  • When Russell T Davies was running the show, what comes to my mind are aliens like the
  • judoon, the slytheen or the ood - odd slightly funny looking, disgusting creatures. You can
  • imagine them all sharing a room together.
  • When comparing this to Chibnall’s season, it’s hard to see the p’ting share a room
  • with Tzim Shaw, or… these cloth monsters. There doesn’t feel like there’s a continuity
  • that ties everything together. We hop from one episode to the next and it feels as if
  • they purposely want to place each one in a bubble. By the time Tzim Shaw shows up in
  • the finale episode, it doesn’t feel that exciting or interesting as his presence in
  • the universe feels small and unimportant.
  • In Joss Whedon’s Firefly, the reavers are hinted at in the very first episode. They’re
  • established within the lore of the show as a race of deadly cannibals, in a further episode
  • we see the aftermath of one of their attacks. As one of the main antagonists for the season,
  • the plan was to slowly build up to a reaver confrontation. The show was cancelled before
  • Whedon was able to achieve this, but he was able to focus on them for the film ‘Serenity’.
  • In Russell T Davies first season, he brought on Robert Shearman to write an episode entitled
  • ‘Dalek’, this expanded more on the lore of the show, giving us more information about
  • the Time War and showed the potentness of a singular Dalek, as we see it murdering the
  • shit out of everyone. Then when it came to the series finale, Russell brings in an entire
  • fleet, thousands of the fuckers.
  • This finale also takes place in the same location as a previous episode in the same season.
  • It’s been a hundred years since the Doctor was last there and the station has become
  • an Orwellian dystopian nightmare. The Doctor is heartbroken to discover his involvement
  • in the station a hundred years prior is exactly what led to the very future he’s found himself
  • in. When it looks like all is lost, The Doctor sends Rose back home to protect her. It’s
  • here that she sits with her mother and Micky and realises that she’s unable to go back
  • to her old life and leave the doctor to die alone. Both Jackie Tyler and Micky Smith were
  • supporting characters in ‘Fathers Day’ and ‘Boom Town’ and both featured heavily
  • in the Slytheen two-parter. It’s in the season finale that we see all the various
  • elements of the first season be re-incorporated and brought back. This continuity between
  • episodes feels hella satisfying and makes the universe truly immersive.
  • Chibnall tries to up the stakes in his finale by having Tzim Shaw threaten to decimate entire
  • planets, with the last planet being earth, but these planets haven’t been established
  • in any previous episodes, and there are no characters on earth that we’ve seen for
  • longer than a single episode. It’s hard to feel that sense of risk, as we don’t
  • even cut back to earth to see anyone reacting to the incoming alien attack. Despite this
  • being an interplanetary threat, the episode still ends up feeling small scale and pretty
  • standard. Chibnall also tries to make the emotional stakes higher by reminding us that
  • Tzim Shaw is responsible for the death of Graham’s wife and Ryan’s grandmother,
  • Grace. However, as Grace fell off a crane wrestling a tentacle monster it’s hard for
  • the audience to put that same emphasis on Tzim Shaw as Graham does.
  • Nonetheless, Graham raging at Tzim Shaw is the closest thing we get to a character arc
  • in this whole season. Throughout the episodes, we regularly get to see him mourning Grace,
  • when he learns that Tzim Shaw is back, he tells the Doctor that he’s going to kill
  • the toothy twat. The Doctor tells him… not to do that… even though she gleely incinerated
  • that teenager in Kerblam. But the Doctor’s hypocrisy works the trick on Graham, who instead
  • of killing Tzim Shaw, instead opts to put him in a stasis chamber for the rest of eternity,
  • which you could argue is a lot worse than death anyway! If it was me I would definitely
  • choose death over that. Nice one graham you bloated bastard you learnt a lesson… I think.
  • It’s hardly a character arc and more of a character… aaaaaaa. But I guess it’s
  • something?
  • The basis of any good story is change, if you watch a story unfold and by the end of
  • it no one’s learnt anything or developed, it’s an experience similar to watching paint
  • dry. A character arc is when a character goes from one perspective on life to another one.
  • The Doctor remembers who she is and gains some new friends and that’s about it, she
  • doesn’t have to make any difficult decisions or go through any hardships. Ryan has dyspraxia
  • and finds it hard to ride a bike, in one episode he climbs a ladder and that’s about it.
  • He also confronts his father but there was never any indication that he wouldn’t have
  • been able to do this prior to meeting the Doctor. Yaz goes through zero changes and
  • Graham paints a shelf and The Doctor and her companions all sit around it and watch it
  • slowly dry, the status of the paint changes from wet to dry and Graham feels a sense of
  • accomplishment for being able to paint a shelf.
  • Stephen Moffat as a showrunner on Doctor Who employed ambitious narrative arcs in his seasons.
  • Amy Pond starts her first episode running away with the Doctor from her marriage to
  • Rory and her last episode shows her sacrificing her life with The Doctor to spend the rest
  • of her years to live with Rory. Clara slowly becomes obsessive with travelling with The
  • Doctor, she begins to become manipulative and controlling in a way that mirrors the
  • Doctor. Moffat introduces a complex and nuanced romance plot with Professor River Song and
  • The Doctor. Killing her in her first episode and then working backwards, with the two of
  • them always meeting out of sync. The ability to craft these stories over multiple episodes
  • and seasons is the difference between a good showrunner and a bad one.
  • But part of the problem is down to the writers that are being hired to write these episodes.
  • Stephen Moffat was given a lot of freedom when he first introduced River Song and the
  • weeping angels in episodes where Russell T Davies was showrunning. This meant that Moffat
  • could expand and bring back these ideas for his own seasons. They weren’t mates or anything,
  • Moffatt had written a parody episode of Doctor Who for Comic relief and it was well-known
  • that Moffat was a huge Doctor Who fanboy. Russell knew this and asked him to write an
  • episode for his new season.
  • But Moffat wasn’t the only Doctor Who fan that he asked onto the new season, he also
  • brought on Paul Cornell, who had written a Doctor Who novel called ‘Human Nature’.
  • Cornell later adapted this story for series three of the show. Steven Moffat as a showrunner
  • brought on Neil Gaiman and Neil Cross to write episodes, both Neils have a superb sense of
  • style and tone. Neil Cross had been a showrunner on Luther and Neil Gaiman has a perfect sense
  • of distorted fantasy and used his sick writing skills to pen two of the most interesting
  • Doctor Who episodes of the Matt Smith era.
  • Out of all the writers chibnall brought on for his season, none of them had written any
  • Doctor Who stories before or even had any experience writing with sci-fi or high budget
  • drama and sadly, when you bring in people who usually write for low budget soaps - that’s
  • what you’re going to get, low budget soaps.
  • Not only this, but the directing of the new season looks considerably more flat compared
  • to what we have seen in recent seasons. If you look at the directing in ‘Cold War’,
  • an episode where the Doctor goes up against an Ice Warrior on a submarine… during the
  • cold war. We can see how much the directing can influence the tone and genre of the show.
  • It switches from high octate, fast pace action period drama to a directing style that pays
  • homage to the Alien franchise. Soldiers get taken down one by one as if they are in a
  • gritty 80’s sci-fi movie. We’ve also seen directing styles that emulate westerns, Stanley
  • Kubrick and detective noir films. Doctor Who used to have a very cinematic, developed relationship
  • with its camera and use of colour. Comparatively, season 11 feels so flat, it’s very often
  • static and the colours feel washed out, there isn’t that drive to find unique ways to
  • tell its story.
  • But it’s not just the visuals that have been downgraded, tragically one of the most
  • blatant and miserable losses of this new season is Murray Gold. He had been sound tracking
  • doctor who since its 2005 reboot. In those first ten seasons, the show took on many forms,
  • but the one aspect of consistency was Murray Gold. I haven’t really spoken about music
  • much on this channel, but if you bear with me, I’m gonna try and channel my inner ‘Sideways’
  • and attempt to explain why Murray Gold is pure Gold.
  • He composed musical themes and motifs for virtually every aspect of the show. For example
  • in season three, the Doctor, Martha and Captain Jack Harkness are hiding out as fugitives
  • in a Britain where The Master is prime minister. The Doctor starts to talk about his home planet
  • Galifrey and we hear this motif. He goes on to explain that The Master stared into the
  • time vortex and went insane. This track is then repeated when the Master dies and the
  • Doctor torches his body like Luke torches Darth Vader, except this time there’s an
  • even larger homorotic subtext. (REGENERATE!). This motif is used to represent the doctor’s
  • conflicting emotions about the master. The master is the only other timelord alive and
  • the doctor doesn’t want to be alone, but despite this he knows that The Master would
  • rather die than try and be a good person. Okay so bookmark that information, I’ll
  • get back to it.
  • In season 10, we’re introduced to the Doctors new companion, Bill. With a new companion
  • comes a new Murray Gold theme. With Rose’s theme, Gold uses Piano. With Martha’s theme
  • Gold uses a choir, with Donna we get strings and with Bill we have a guitar accompanying
  • piano. Later on in this season, we learn that the Doctor has been keeping the Master, now
  • known as Missy, locked away in a vault. The Doctor and Bill get into deep shit when Bill
  • gives these alien monks consent to enslave Earth. The Doctor and Bill go down into the
  • vault to ask Missy to give them information to help them. She tells them that the only
  • way to defeat the monks is to severe the psychic link between Bill and the monks. The only
  • way to do this is to kill bill.
  • Missy goes on to tell the Doctor that his version of good doesn’t conflate with her
  • own and that she’ll never be the person he wants her to be. This scene is about the
  • Doctor’s conflicted relationship with the master but it’s emotional core is Bill’s
  • response to being told she has to be sacrificed in order to save earth. This is what Murray
  • Gold does musically. He brings back the motif from ten years ago
  • and adds a guitar. There are countless scenes that
  • have this level of multi-faceted musical composition, as Gold has been building up these motifs
  • for 12 years. These musical motifs contributed to the tapestry of the universe, and it gave
  • the show a tangible continuity that brought everything together.
  • But now with season 11 that is all stripped away. The soundtrack is so moist it’s almost
  • ambiance. There are very few moments in which I can say the music really stands out to me
  • and that’s not necessarily because it’s bad, the problem is with its sameness. Phonetically
  • it all sounds similar, none of the companions have a theme and most of it sounds like this.
  • If there had been a musical composition that was used when Grace died, everytime it was
  • brought back we’d know a character would be thinking about her, it would remind us
  • of her tragic death and it would pull on our heartstrings. Before when we saw the cybermen,
  • we’d hear these big loud imposing trombones, if we saw the daleks we’d hear a demonic
  • chorus and now when we see Tzim shaw we hear this.
  • It sounds like a reverbed fart. Would it have really been that difficult to give the guy
  • some kind of menacing motif that could be later reincorporated in the finale, SOMETHING,
  • ANYTHING that could have given this show some sort of gravitas?
  • But this is the problem with season 11. It’s Doctor Who, but it feels drained of a lot
  • of its ambition and energy that was present with the previous showrunners. With the previous
  • ten seasons, it felt like they had a thought through plan, goals they wanted to achieve
  • with narrative and scope, there seemed to be a real deal of passion behind the show.
  • But now, it feels like it’s scrambling for itself to try and find some footing, it feels
  • rushed. However… I wonder to myself whether this is down entirely to Chibnall…
  • When Stephen Moffat took over from Russel T Davies as Doctor Who showrunner, it wasn’t
  • like Russell handled him the keys and ran away. He asked him to before season 4 had
  • even been broadcast. He then made sure Moffat had lots of time to develop and plan his vision
  • for the show. While Moffat was writing and making plans for season 5, Russell wrote 5
  • episodes which were slowly released over a year. Then when Moffat took over, it had more
  • of an continuity between the episodes, as we saw one era of who slowly bleed into the
  • other. Moffat didn’t want to fuck with the continuity Russell had built over 4 seasons,
  • so he built his first season finale around the idea of resetting the whole universe to
  • be able to give himself complete narrative freedom without effecting canon.
  • But the transition from Mofatt to Chibnall doesn’t seem to have been handled with the
  • same amount of care. Moffat’s season was supposed to end with ‘The Doctor Falls’
  • and Chibnall was expected to write the following Christmas special which intended to be released
  • just 6 months afterwards. But when Chibnall went ‘Uh no actually, I don’t want to
  • do that’, Moffat agreed to do it instead. What happened behind the scenes, I’m not
  • sure, but the BBC moved Doctor Who from Saturday nights to Sunday nights and it broadcast at
  • an earlier time than normal. Then the number of episodes per season was cut down from 13
  • to 10.
  • My crackpot theory is that Chibnall didn’t have enough time to write and develop his
  • vision of Doctor Who. That’s why the Tardis looks like a power ranger cave, that’s why
  • so many of the stories feel botched and bland and that’s why the characters feel underdeveloped.
  • I also think this is why immediately after the release of season 11, the BBC announced
  • that Doctor who would be taking a year break before returning for season 12.
  • But regardless of what’s happening behind the scenes of production, I know one thing
  • for certain. Showrunning Doctor Who is really fucking difficult. The production that goes
  • into an episode of Doctor Who is nothing like any other long running show. The level of
  • craft and budget that goes into one episode of modern Doctor Who is the equivalent of
  • most low-budget films. Can you think of any other television show that has this many sets,
  • this many actors, this many special effects, this many fucking narrative strands to keep
  • up with, with this much pressure? Every script has to be different and funny and scary and
  • family friendly, but also all has to live up to the expectations set up over decades
  • of television. It can’t repeat itself, but it also can’t be too different and the fans
  • always complain, they are never satisfied.
  • But despite all these hardships and struggles that come with making this show, all it ever
  • really manages to be, at its very best, is average. Genesis of the Daleks is considered
  • by many to be the best classic Doctor Who serial, it’s Tom Baker at his best and it’s
  • written by Terry Nation, the guy who invented the Daleks and wrote their very first story
  • in the 60s. The episode gives the chilling origin story of the Daleks and it has Sarah
  • Jane Smith, one of the greatest classic companions. Its pure peng juice and I love it, but if
  • you grab someone randomly off the street, take them into your degenerate dingy basement,
  • sit them down on your pile of newspapers and force them to watch your limited edition blu
  • ray of Genesis of the Daleks, from start to finish. Chances are they’ll yawn themselves
  • to death. They won’t give a shit. It’s dated now, it’s slow and dialogue heavy
  • and that’s the best classic who has to offer.
  • Then when you get to Russell T Davies, his first season is outstanding, it’s funny,
  • clever, it has great characters. But it still has farting aliens, a villain played by simon
  • pegg who worships a CGI blob monster and a romantic subtext with a 900 year old alien
  • man and a 19 year old girl.
  • Then you get to Moffat and boy oh boy does he go full whack at times. Remember how I
  • talked about his plotline with River Song? Through multiple seasons and episodes we’re
  • constantly questioning who this woman is and who she is to the Doctor, Moffat builds up
  • to the grand reveal. And it’s Amy Ponds daughter, who is also part timelord because
  • she was conceived on the Tardis. What…? Oh you know Amy’s best friend Melody? No
  • I’ve never seen her before… No she’s always been there, we just never had her in
  • any episodes before… that’s weird, why are you bringing in a new character out of
  • nowhere… Surprise she’s River Song. What? Why are you fucking ruining it Moffat, you
  • hack fraud.
  • Oh but wait, let’s just go back to Russell briefly. His last ever Doctor Who story is
  • called ‘The End Of Time’ and it’s a master story. The Master comes back from the
  • dead and he keeps eating chicken and he shoots lightning out his hands and Donna’s grandpa
  • is in it and loads of other old people and the Doctor just keeps walking around and telling
  • everyone he’s going to die and Russell brings back the time lords in it and none of it makes
  • any sense. The Master turns everyone on earth… into him? He started off so well and now he’s
  • just fucked it, he’s fucked all of it. Why are you fucking ruining it Russell, you hack
  • fraud.
  • And despite knowing all of this, despite knowing that a vast vast majority of the people that
  • connect with and love this show are most likely 12 year kids that couldn’t give less of
  • a shit about character conflict, narrative structure, gender politics and social historical
  • issues. I still spent three months putting together this video and all it’s done is
  • lead me back to the same question I had at the very start of all of this.
  • Doctor Who is not popular because it’s a “good” show, in fact a lot of the time
  • it is pretty trash, corny and dumb. Even at its best that is what it is. So why is it
  • that a show like Doctor Who has been so popular for fifty years? Because doctor who is not
  • like any show ever, it’s less of a narrative tv show at this point and more of this limitless
  • box which, with good writing can be filled to the brim with memorable and unique ideas.
  • A lot of doctor who is getting through the schlock, the sludge to get to those episodes
  • which are really special, or even within the bad stuff you can get special moments.
  • The second episode of tenants first season, ‘New Earth’ has the Doctor and Rose go
  • to… New Earth. This episode finds them in a futuristic hospital and it ends with the
  • doctor curing every disease in the universe by combining all the medicine… so yeah,
  • it’s really dumb. But within this episode is also a playful body switch subplot where
  • we get to see David Tenant and Billie Piper show off their comedic range as they keep
  • getting possessed by Cassandra, a neurotic flirty crazy skinflap. Watching these actors
  • switch between different physicalities and voices is insanely fun and entertaining. Cassandra
  • is able to express the characters inner thoughts and hidden secrets, which adds to the charactisation
  • of our lead protagonists. It’s goofy weird shit like this, that can’t be found in any
  • other show.
  • When doctor who gets good; it’s truly something sincerely special and that’s why it’s
  • so easy to stick by. Even now, even when it’s being it’s least interesting to me, I’m
  • aware that I’m only judging this by the criteria that I want my doctor who to meet.
  • For me, that’s weird crazy out there stories, aliens that can live in two dimensions, conscious
  • fat that jumps out of people, the doctors tardis becoming human and flirting with him.
  • The fact that all these things can exist under the same tv show is a sign of how varied this
  • show can be. The shows format is one that can always surprise us; each episode is a
  • fresh start, a chance to tell a new story, to look at different characters, worlds and
  • themes. In 2013, Adult Swim aired Rick and Morty, the show’s format is a super intelligent
  • old man travelling to various worlds and going on science fiction adventures with his young
  • naïve assistant. It’s become a huge smash hit and it only goes to show that this format
  • is far far from dead and we can expect to have people writing Doctor Who stories for
  • further decades to come.
  • But Chibnalls run isn’t without little glimmers of hope. Alan Cummings in the witchfinder
  • is jokes, a dalek possessing a young geologist all bodysnatchers style set to rock music
  • is proper up my alley and the doctor negotiating peace with a sentient universe that’s taken
  • the shape of a frog is lit as hell.
  • These elements that I enjoy most about the show are still there, in very brief moments
  • but they are present, and for as long as they are I’m going to keep watching and probably
  • complaining and that’s alright. The love one has for Doctor who is generally better
  • defined by how much you can hate it and still watch it, because no matter how bad or even
  • bland doctor who can be… it will always be special and with such a vocal community
  • you can spend hours finding out the different perspectives and views on this behemoth of
  • a television show, and really. I wouldn’t have
  • it any other way.
  • In the 60s, Doctor Who was just another show, people would watch it and enjoy it, but as
  • the years turned into decades and as the children grew up, analysing and discussing what they
  • enjoyed and didn’t enjoy about the show became part of the fun. By having so many
  • different narrative elements that can be cross examined and developed, the magic of the writing
  • process was deconstructed by the fans. They weren’t simply watching a TV show anymore,
  • they were consciously watching the difference between good writers and bad writers, good
  • villains and bad villains, they saw the same Doctor stuck on a space base story over and
  • over again but with slightly different elements and this led them to see art more critically
  • and write Doctor Who stories of their own. These fans would go on to be some of the biggest
  • names in television and influence a whole new generation of budding science fiction
  • writers. Chris Chibnall himself was a prominent member of the Doctor Who society and was one
  • of the shows biggest critics, this informed his own path as a writer.
  • When Doctor Who fans watch a bad episode of Doctor Who, they see wasted potential, because
  • they have hundreds of episodes, novels and audio dramas to directly compare it to. Their
  • desire is to watch a flawless season, something different but also familiar, out of this world
  • fantastic science fiction concepts, but also grounded in reality with finely scripted character
  • drama and a sense of pathos. They want classic villains re-interpreted in new ways but also
  • new brand new antagonists that will become iconic in their own way. This is impossible,
  • as everyones version of good Doctor Who is different, it’s all subjective. The most
  • popular, most viewed episodes of the show are all pretty mediocre stories that just
  • so happened to be on television when nothing else was on, or they were broadcast on Christmas
  • when everyone at home was bloated with meat and drunk and just wanted to watch something
  • familiar with the whole family.
  • So in conclusion, Season 11 of Doctor Who is badly written, the characters have nothing
  • going for them, the science fiction elements are trash and it lacks the vivaciousness we’ve
  • seen in the previous ten seasons. It might get better, it might not. But it doesn’t
  • matter because we’ve had ten seasons of a pretty unique wonderful television show.
  • Peep Show had 9 seasons, Sopranos had 6, The Wire had 5, Dirk gently’s holistic detective
  • agency only had two and Firefly didn’t even finish its first season. Nothing lasts forever
  • and we’ve got to accept that. If your bummed out about this new season, just go back and
  • watch all of Who, that’s what I did and I had a great time. But there’s still a
  • ton of Big Finish audio books with the actors reprising their role, there’s Chimes of
  • Midnight and Jubilee annnd Spare Parts and Human Resources and most of these are on Spotify
  • too.
  • We’ve had an abundance of spectacular Doctor Who stories and we’ll get more in the future.
  • Let’s see what Chibnall produces next, if it sucks at least we can analysis it and talk
  • about it, at least it will distract us from the meaningless pit of existence. SO yeah
  • it doesn’t matter, nothing matters. Thanks for listening to my words. Make sure to like,
  • subscribe and Let me know what you think in the comments, be sure to start an endless
  • chain of debates down there, if someone says their opinion of the show and you disagree
  • with it, make sure to tell them exactly that, just turn it into a war zone down there. Phew
  • well that’s the video finally done, I finally said my piece, ahhhh… feels good to get
  • that off my chest. What you still doing here? I’m done, I’ve finished. It’s over,
  • I spoke about everything. Oh alright, since you made it this far, I’ll give tell you
  • a bit about my life at the moment.
  • Remember the bit in my 13 reasons why season 2 review when Max covered himself in blue
  • paint and pretended to be Will Smith from Aladdin? And then, when Sam wished to be smol
  • like Matt Damon in Downsizing?
  • I had that illustrated, released a song about it and then I made a ‘NitPix’ fashion
  • line. We just won best show at London fashion week. The judges said “Cool colours bro.
  • Would be cool if the sweatshirts were available in white and they were a bit cheaper.” So
  • yeah, I’ve done that now. The sale of which go towards more short films, like this one
  • we made based off a tweet. Speaking of tweets, if you follow me on twitter and reply to this
  • pinned tweet, you can get a White Sweatshirt for free. www.NitPix.co.uk. Get some lush
  • T-shirts and the Jumpers. We ship internationally
  • and all baby.

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Doctor Who is a BBC science fiction time travelling show made for the entire family. It was first broadcast in 1963 and since then, it hasn’t changed much. Or has it? In 2018 Chris Chibnall took over as Doctor Who showrunner and proceeded to make the biggest changes to date. Making Jodie Whittaker’s Doctor a woman. Is this SJW’s gone too far? Or was this just a necessary change to keep the show modern and popular?

Well in this 85 minute season 11 review of Doctor Who, I go through all of that plus more bits where I look at the concept of ‘showrunning’. I say the words ‘Doctor Who’ 453 times in this video, I finally get to give Steven Moffat and Russell T Davies the respect they deserve and I open up more about my old job as an Amazon fulfilment worker.

Clothing:
https://www.nitpix.co.uk

NitPix boys reviewing EVERY episode of New Who:
Series 1-4:
/watch?v=AgmcQKKMyPs
Series 5-7:
/watch?v=2J-8L9Hy_OY
Series 8-10
/watch?v=GhjbcHRmGfg

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https://www.patreon.com/NitPix

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https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPSEq7RFYm5Usypxm2BbBZA

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https://www.instagram.com/nitpix/

Full Track List:
http://www.twitlonger.com/show/n_1sqrqm1

Spotify playlist of all music used in NitPix:
https://t.co/IC9jDZTOju