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The Cult of JACKIE - 'Jehovah Allah Christ Krishna Immortal Easwaran' (2017)

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Jan 27, 2017

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The Cult of JACKIE - 'Jehovah Allah Christ Krishna Immortal Easwaran' (2017)
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Transcription

  • Three women who came they've been held as slaves in a home in London for at
  • least Thirty years have been rescued by the Police. They're described as a 69
  • year old Malaysian woman, a 57 year old, aged 69 year old from Malaysia, a 57 year
  • old from Ireland, and a 30 year old British woman were all rescued. All three
  • women were highly traumatized and were taken to a place of safety where they
  • remain. We have seen some cases where people have been held for up to 10 years
  • but we have never seen anything of this magnitude before. Thank you
  • It's, you know, it's kind of impossible to believe that something like that could
  • happen. Well i didn't know nothing about 'til i read it in the papers that he was like keeping
  • them as slaves or brainwashing them or what, you know. But I didn't know nothing
  • about it. When I first heard this strange and intriguing story, I wanted to
  • discover how this could have happened right under our noses in the heart of
  • London.
  • It's only now, three years after the women emerged from captivity, that I've
  • been able to piece together a full account of this extraordinary story.
  • He's 'God', he rules the world, he's immortal
  • and he's our leader and teacher and we just have to obey him otherwise we will die.
  • The first contact with the women was made by a charity who rescued them from
  • a flat in Brixton in South London. We got there about 11:05 because there was a
  • window of opportunity when the people who weren't in the house.
  • And sure enough these women all come out at exactly 11:15 sharp. Coming up
  • in the car somebody wanted to know why the cars coming towards us had white
  • lights - That was Aisha - and the cars in front of us had red lights. Do you want to know why that was.?
  • In the immediate aftermath none of the agencies involved knew what they
  • were dealing with. So the women were spirited away to Leeds where they could
  • be protected from the press and the public.
  • Yvonne Hall and Gerard Stocks run an organization helping people who've been
  • trafficked and enslaved.
  • They took the three women under their own roof and were the first to realize
  • the full extent of what had taken place.
  • The 69 year old Malaysian woman seen here on the left is Aisha. The 57 year
  • old Irish woman on the right is Josie. And the 30 year old is Katie. When she
  • first came, yeah she was 30 years old in the way we measure age, but she wasn't.
  • She was much probably nearer to 10 or 11 or something like that, again I'm not a
  • psychologist but I didn't think that would be accurate from what other people...
  • I would even go in further, i would say she was 10 or 11 in her ability to communicate
  • verbally, but in her ability to actually do practical daily tasks, I probably drop
  • it back down to maybe six stroke seven.
  • It became clear that Katie had been born in captivity and had never known any
  • other life
  • She had never been to school and had only rarely left the house. After much
  • delicate discussion Katie finally agreed to an interview. Did you ever go to the
  • dentist or the doctor? No. Not allowed. And why was that.? I guess he, i guess
  • he didn't want anybody to know of my existence, that was part of it, but he
  • also used to say that "NHS means 'Never Helps Self' " So we should, if we get
  • ill, you have to focus on him and then we'll get better as if by magic.
  • Good evening and welcome to the BBC's News at 6
  • The couple suspected of holding three women as slaves for more than 30 years
  • have been named as Aravindan Balakrishnan and his wife Chanda. The BBC
  • understands that both were leading figures in a far-left communist faction
  • based in Brixton in South London in the 1970s. Up in Leeds the women began to talk
  • about life in what they termed 'The Collective'. They referred to Balakrishnan
  • as 'Comrade Bala' or A.B., and revealed that he had had control over
  • every aspect of their lives. He had threatened and terrified them claiming
  • to have an invisible all-powerful machine at his disposal which he called "Jackie".
  • Tell me about Jackie, what does Jackie stand for? Jehovah Allah Christ
  • Krishna and Immortal Easwaran. And what was Jackie? It's Bala's mind-control machine.
  • Who controls everything in nature and
  • everything in the world. And what would he say that Jackie would do to you if you
  • did the wrong thing or stood up to him or.? Kill you or cause you terrible harm
  • 'Jackie' came up a lot with all three people. And even now I would
  • suggest that two of the three absolutely are definitely very scared of Jackie, that
  • Jackie's going to take revenge at some point. Are they leaflets about comrade Bala yeah?
  • Despite having voluntarily left The Collective, Josie Herival has
  • spent the last three years on a one-woman mission to clear Balakrishnan's name.
  • Thank you very much. Are you and others also fighting?, are you part of the campaign with
  • other people as well? Absolutely! We are showing solidarity with all of the people who are suffering under
  • the British State you know. US-led British state. It's a slave of America.
  • Britain is a slave of America.
  • And how is comrade Bala?
  • No No! I'm not being interviewed, Ok, I don't to be interviewed. She declined to take part in this film
  • declaring the BBC, "a tool of the British fascist state". In the one
  • interview she gave to Channel 4 News in 2015 she gave her view of Jackie. What
  • I understand about it is, it's it's a machine, you know, electronic machine
  • which helps people to do good you know.? But he has talked about people dying as a
  • result of that machine - Yeah - Do you believe that? I do, yeah. That he had
  • the power to make somebody die.? Yes. With Jackie's help - Balakrishnan
  • controlled the world from inside the flat. He took credit for all global
  • events, including wars and natural disasters.
  • Everything that happened outside, like earthquakes and hurricanes, he claimed
  • was a consequence of a lack of discipline or misbehavior by his
  • followers inside. We asked that space shuttle Challenger it was meant to have
  • blown up when he said that people were challenging him in the house, and the
  • shape was like a 'Y'. When the shuttle blew up it was like a 'Y'. So he used to say
  • it's because people are VYING with him. So the 'Y' there like that in the sky.
  • The Collective lived at numerous addresses in South London over the 40
  • years of its existence. At one address, a pizza delivery boy rang their bell by mistake.
  • So Bala said that this was the fascist
  • state trying to provoke him. What, by bringing the pizza? Yeah by bring the
  • pizza and disturbing him and disturbing what he was doing. So then the same day
  • there was an earthquake in Kobe in Japan, which meant that, 'Kobe'
  • means 'gods door', that's what he said. So he said when there was a knock on god's door...
  • Sort of crazy, but yes. Go on, finish that thought, so when there was a knock on god
  • door, then there's this huge earthquake in Kobe to punish the fascist state for the
  • fact that the pizza delivery man came to God's door. Bala's door?
  • Bala's door.
  • When I was asking her about some of the strange theories that Balakrishnan had - she laughed -
  • she would laugh. - Yes she would have done. It's not because she thinks it's funny, it's because she's really
  • embarrassed or really pressured. It's a really important thing to know when if
  • you're asking a question to isn't it really because a lot of people will see the
  • laugh and think, 'Oh! she thinks it's funny', whereas really, she the, at,
  • she's in distress at that point.
  • Using Jackie as his tool, what was his plan, to become the ruler of the world? Yes, or he used to say, to
  • become the overt ruler of the world, he was already the ruler of the world, but then
  • he has to become overt, that's what he used to say. So he was the covert ruler
  • world at this point? Yes. Yep. Inside the flat. Yep. And and and he
  • was going to becoming overt ruler. Yes. And how was that going to happen, what was
  • going to happen that suddenly would mean that the whole world would obey him.?
  • He never exactly said. He was going to take over the universe after the world. And to
  • see if she could eventually take over the world, I believe the country that
  • was mentioned was Brazil. She was going to get Brazil as a starter to see if she
  • could control that okay. I know. So that she was being primed for ruler of Brazil?
  • Yeah. Why Brazil, i've absolutely no idea. Does she know, had she been, does she know
  • much about Brasil? I don't know. I don't think so.
  • He walked into my life, and now he's taken over. --- It all began in 1976 when Balakrishnan
  • founded his Maoist collective. The workers Institute of Marxism, Leninism, Mao Zedong
  • thought was on Acre Lane in Brixton in South London
  • His group included his Tanzanian wife Chanda,
  • her disabled sister and about 15 core followers, most of whom like him was
  • student from Asia.
  • One of them, Aishah Wahab, has never spoken to the media before. She had come
  • from Malaysia at the age of 24 to study Quantity Surveying. I was really inspired
  • by him you know, and I thought he he was great, you know, to have been able to know
  • clarify our minds as to what to do with our lives really. Were you happy living
  • in The Collective Aishah.? Yes I thought every day was very interesting
  • and I was never ever bored. There's always something new to learn. There's
  • something new to do I mean everything was, I just can't imagine I would have
  • had a better life than that.
  • Also in the group were two middle-class British women. Josie who was studying
  • Music when she met Balakrishnan. And Sian Davis, a postgraduate student at the
  • London School of Economics. I was particularly intrigued by Sian's story.
  • How did you know Sian.? I was at school her. And what school was it.? It was
  • Cheltenham Ladies College. She was academic I think she was quite profoundly
  • academic in a funny way, it wasn't necessary the type of academia that
  • passed exams of a very high level at that stage, but she was a deep thinker.
  • Oh well we used to see them down on the market place. We used to have
  • our paper sales there, and other groups did as well - it is a bit of a crowded market
  • - and these guys would turn up. And they didn't have a paper to sell, but they
  • used to hand out leaflets. And we used to collect them because they were sort of like
  • the comic relief. And we popped down the pub afterwards for a pint and we
  • just roar with laughter at what the Workers Institute had to say. The Communist Party
  • of China and Chairman Mao are on the verge of launching the final offensive
  • this year. Dismantled the old world of colonialism, imperialism and hegemonism
  • and build a new world of Socialism. And then in emphasis,
  • Eternal glory to our great leader and teacher Chairman Mao Tse-tung upholds
  • proletarian internationalism. There we are.
  • I have one specific memory of her which is probably the last time I saw her I can't
  • be sure of that, but I think it probably was when she invited me for dinner. She
  • had her boyfriend Martin there. And she was dressed in, dressed like a
  • Maoist, with the blue and the collar and the whole dinner
  • we had the Chinese Communist radio playing. And she talked to me,
  • well the way she talked to me I didn't know who she was. She had become a communist
  • in the way she was talking to me, she she, there was nothing of her coming through
  • at all by this stage that's what I would say, it was quite scary. I didn't like
  • being there, it was too late. I had to stay the night. She didn't want to
  • give me a bed because I wasn't a communist but I got a mattress
  • eventually, and I'm afraid the next morning I just ran away.
  • One of the things that is interesting is that the Workers Institute was probably
  • unique among the groups of the far left in that they didn't see themselves as
  • being in the business of creating a revolution. They saw their role as
  • preparing the population in the imperialist heartlands as they referred to
  • Brixton, London, Britain - for liberation by the Chinese.
  • Did they put or set a date when the Chinese Liberation Army was going to do this.?
  • End of 1977. And so very early in 1978 I had a conversation with several of them,
  • their members at the time, expressed my disappointment that I had not been
  • liberated from capitalist oppression as they had predicted. And they said that
  • the computer satellites got so good that actually the Chinese do already control
  • everything in the world, but they realized that you can't hand people Socialism on
  • a plate, they need to learn to struggle for themselves. So they have actually
  • taken over everything but they're leaving the appearance of Capitalism in
  • place so that people can actually have this experience of liberating themselves.
  • The idea was that the Chinese Red Army would come and liberate the UK within a
  • year, that's what Bala expected, you remember that? Yes. So you're waiting for
  • that to happen? Yes, it didn't happen. It didn't happen did it? Yes
  • I came across Aravindan Balakrishnan in the mid-seventies. It was my formative
  • years as a police officer, I was a uniformed police officer in Brixton.
  • And it really was an age of lots happening. There was anti capitalist marches.
  • Whole environment like a cauldron of demonstration. And in amongst all of that
  • appeared in these premises here in Acre Lane what was called The Chairman Mao
  • Memorial Centre. And this was quite intriguing even for those days and i decided to pay
  • them a visit one day. And I said to Balakrishnan "I'm going to be watching you"
  • And I'll be looking out every time I come by what you're doing in here.
  • The Workers Institute were raided, that was very very rare, we were all surprised
  • considering these guys had no presence anywhere and where we just like a nuisance
  • to the authorities on a non-political nature. We the police got a warrant and
  • it's very telling we got that warrant under the Misuse of Drugs Act because you know
  • our belief was these people were on some form of drugs and the place was raided
  • by police, no drugs were found and it was boarded up and closed down. And while
  • their view is going to be 'yes this is the capitalist state closing us down',
  • while I'm sorry sometimes it needs a hard hand. Well we call it trumped up charge,
  • you see, the charge was about having drugs, having and holding drugs and
  • consuming drugs as well. So none of us even smoked cigarettes, so
  • we don't know anything about drugs. This was seen as persecution, and as I
  • understand it that's when Balakrishnan then withdrew into a much more almost
  • hermetic kind of environment with just a very very small group of mostly female
  • acolytes
  • People would just say every so often, whatever happened to the Workers
  • Institute? Because they suddenly disappeared because they'd always be
  • there on the corner of Brixton, and then suddenly disappeared and now we know
  • what happened - they went underground, or what was left of them.
  • By 1980, The Collective was living in hiding and consisted of Balakrishnan
  • his wife and her sister and seven other women including Sian, Josie and Aisha.
  • Exploiting their isolation from the world, Balakrishnan indoctrinated them
  • with increasingly strange ideas. Was it your understanding that he was immortal?
  • Well he did say that and he did repeat it again and again, and he also
  • showed how it was possible for him to be able to.
  • How did he show you that? Well you know different things for example he never
  • believed in going to the dentist because he said we should let the teeth drop naturally.
  • Hello again. Hello. And then by the time you're a hundred years the teeth
  • will regrow. Pleased to meet you.
  • And then you have another set of teeth and then when those drop you'll regrow again.
  • You see you've lost quite a number of teeth over the years.
  • We loose teeth. We wait until the teeth grow again.
  • Until the tooth grows on its own.? Yes. It will grow on its own, are 100 or over yes
  • It will grow back on its own? Yes. Have you ever heard of that, we have a lot of teeth growing back.?
  • No. No. Well i've heard of it, It does happen, but I don't know if I'm going to be
  • even hundred years old, so. Yeah yes you see sometimes its better to
  • keep what you have rather than wait for. No No I don't loose my teeth on
  • purpose. No no no no. I don't know what what our stories that let the teeth
  • fall by itself and it will grow up again. Who
  • who said this to you? Somebody i know. Right.
  • I suppose again you know from the outside it does sound like you were
  • brainwashed what's your response to that Aisha.? I think it's a question of being
  • wash, I quite agree. I think they did the line that we were
  • given is that we do need to be our brains didn't need to be washed because
  • it was you know it was dirty or mucky, you know, whatever, it had to be washed of
  • all ideas. When you bring, you want to build a new world, you can't bring the old into it,
  • the old you know into it so we have to chip away the old and in place you can't
  • leave it blank we have to fill the void
  • In 1983 Balakrishnan's socialist program took a new and sinister direction. He
  • began an experiment which he called 'Project Prem'. When Katie was born did you
  • know who the father of the baby was.? No.
  • I did ask Sian, i said, because at first when she was pregnant, we didn't know she
  • pregnant, well I didn't anyway, so I said "Sian, you know, are you pregnant?",
  • because her tummy was going, because, she says "No", l said why is you body like
  • this? So she said. 'You know A.B. said some people do have it like this, that's
  • gas in the body' and and you know it gets bigger and bigger so that's it. And
  • when Katie was born, I was really shocked. Do you think Sian believed that, did she
  • know she was pregnant.? Maybe she didn't, I don't know, maybe she didn't either, you know.
  • That must have been a real surprise when, so she just had a big tummy
  • for whatever strange reason and then suddenly a baby arrives.? That's right yes.
  • I think he used to say that I was the product of electronic warfare.
  • His mind control machine Jackie was meant to have got
  • Sian pregnant I suppose. Tell me what name you were given at birth Katie.?
  • Prem Maopinduzi. The first name 'Prem' is in Asian language it means 'Love',
  • and the second name is Swahili it means 'Revolution'.
  • So he meant 'Love Revolution' and I hated that.
  • So you name is like an instruction. You must love revolution? Yes. And we thought that when he rules the
  • the world that I meant to be like a soldier for him or his mouthpiece.
  • 'Project Prem' was an experiment in child rearing intended to eliminate the
  • nuclear family.
  • Comrade Prem - as Katie was known - was dressed in genderless clothing, was never
  • told who her parents were, and was raised collectively by the group.
  • It's a new way of looking after a baby, its not done before. I am so used to babies
  • being held and cuddled and carried and things like that.
  • We were discouraged from doing those things because -- I wasn't really clear
  • exactly what what the correct lines were but it meant to, um, you see the baby's meant
  • to be solid without any encumbrances from anywhere else, you see, so we're just meant
  • to stand by him, herself. I suppose that was the idea you know
  • that when you hold somebody or caress somebody, there's a bonding
  • going on you, there's a bond between baby and mother. But there wasn't
  • that encouraged in Katie.
  • He was the only one who was meant to cuddle me and no one else was meant to
  • because if I was to cuddle other people, he used to say that that's being about being
  • a lesbian to cuddle other women. When Katie was born there was plenty things I had
  • to question and this was one of them about treatment of Katie, disciplining of
  • her, and there was a discipline on me as well, there was once when Katie wets
  • herself, and she was only four, and you know she was denounced and I was
  • denounced as well for letting her wet, and I was so angry about it,
  • i really felt like running out the house at that time but I didn't, I tried hard
  • not to because then I could see that if I had gone out I had nobody outside.
  • I lost contact my family, I had no money, I had no job and I might have been deported.
  • They were strange. If you see them on the street, even shopping,
  • they never say 'hello'. They just go straight in out, yeah. If I'm in
  • the garden, they're upstairs, if they see anyone out, see - if you look up they close
  • the curtains, so you don't actually see who's looking. What do you think they were
  • unusual neighbours? I think they were just refugees, - and lived there.
  • Or they were hiding from somebody, never speak. But one look like she looked like
  • English, but the others look like Chinese or Filipino whatever. But one - she's tall
  • and rest short. The garden was overgrown, it must have been 3 - 4 foot all the time
  • since them people left, and it was the same with the front of the house. He would never
  • cut anything, he would always tie the stuff back, just enough to get the wheelchair in & out.
  • And the whole garden was covered in weeds.
  • Curtains were never opened at any time at all front or back of house, the only time
  • you see them was sometimes at their back when their little girl when she would turn round
  • pop the head of pop back down again.
  • Is it disturbing to you Peter to think that there was a child being held captive
  • next door.? I mean I've been talking to yourself now especially bringing a lump to the throat.
  • What aspect of it is upsetting for you Peter? It's just the thought of what that
  • child has gone through at the time I just didn't do anything about it. I mean
  • and i'm so sorry i let it. Again I didn't know what was happening but if I did, I'd
  • definitely would have done something about it.
  • One night 1996 there was screaming in the middle of the night and subsequently I
  • learned that Sian had tried to stab herself with a knife.
  • And then on the early morning of Christmas Eve - again there was
  • screaming and shouting in the middle of the night, so I went downstairs with Aisha
  • who I was sleeping with and found Sian's. Sian was lying on the floor and she had
  • been tied up her hands and legs were tied and she was gagged.
  • And she had this piece of cloth in her mouth - it was a sock or something
  • i don't know. And O & Josie were both holding her down on the floor and they had tied
  • her up. And Bala and Chanda were both shouting at her. She had tried to run out,
  • that's why she was tied up, she knew things he was hard to live with me as I
  • was trying to escape, and then because she couldn't escape that way that's why
  • she went out through the window thinking she could escape that way she
  • had lost her mind by that time.
  • A.B. said that she fell, he started from the beginning to say that she fell you know because of the
  • nature of the bathroom, so I just stuck to that.
  • Having fallen from the bathroom window Sian was taken to hospital where she
  • fell into a coma and died seven months later. There was an inquest after Sian's
  • death. And at that inquest you were asked whether she had any children? Yes. And you
  • said no? No yes. Why was that your response? Because A.B. said to do so.
  • Because we definitely didn't want Katie to be taken away and then live a
  • life as of old, you know, and not participate to build a new society.
  • At the time of the inquest, a journalist visited The Collective and had an
  • exchange on the doorstep with Josie, Aisha, and a third woman Oh Kareng, who was
  • also from Malaysia. the colloid bomber policy we're calling open I expect on
  • you we speak the common ballot we don't wish oh yeah are you playing in the fun
  • everything that people really good job you guys seem pretty likely we should be
  • why one discrete actually please could we speak to Col rosada
  • Sian died when Katie was only 14. After she died, did life get better or worse for you.?
  • Life got better for me in a funny way I mean because she was one of the worst, like
  • servants of Bala. So it was such a relief with her not there. Because of his worse
  • enforcer had gone.? Yes his worse enforcer had gone. Yes.
  • Life may have improved, but the unbearable tyranny of Project Prem continued.
  • He used to say that everything would go against me if I had done wrong. So like
  • possibly the light shouldn't work, or the taps shouldn't work because
  • everything is controlled by him, by Jackie, his mind control machine. So if I
  • went to the bathroom and turned the tap on, it shouldn't work because I had done wrong
  • and then when I went to the bathroom and the tap DID work, Oh the tap! - your on
  • my side! Thank you! And then I kissed tap and hugged the toilet when the flush worked
  • I used to look forward to the clocks changing
  • when they used to go forward in March or go backwards in October because
  • that made things a bit different get darker or lighter in the evenings.
  • In 2004 Comrade Oh who had been with Balakrishnan since the Seventies had an
  • accident in the kitchen. I think she banged her head and she collapsed
  • and she was shouting 'call the doctor'. Bala and Chanda kept harassing
  • her as she was collapsing and she was ill and kept saying ... talking
  • talking talking to her and try to force her to answer questions, and she couldn't
  • answer because she was she was dying really and then they started saying to
  • her stop throwing a tantrum, nobody bangs their head and refuses to talk and things
  • like that. But she was actually unable to to talk because she was, she had a stroke
  • and then the next day she died.
  • By now two comrades had died and three other women who had been with the group
  • since the 1970s had chosen to leave. The Collective had dwindled to just six.
  • Balakrishnan, his wife Chanda, her sister and Katie, and
  • only two remaining followers, Josie and Aisha. Josie and Aisha were required to do
  • all the housework. And The Collective depended financially on Chanda's carer's
  • allowance and her sister's disability benefit. Balakrishnan continued to
  • frighten the few remaining members of the household into staying. He also used to say
  • that, if I defied him and just wanted to go out on my own, then either there will be
  • a lightning will strike me dead or blow up because of spontaneous human combustion
  • That you would spontaneously combust? Yes. Or explode?
  • To me that idea that someone would spontaneously combust if they left their
  • flat is complete nonsense to me in my worldview. Now that you're out and living
  • your own life, can you see that that sounds like nonsense.? Well I can see
  • that it can be as nonsensical, but there is such a thing as spontaneous
  • human combustion. I've read about it in two or three different places, so I have an
  • open mind about that
  • But as to whether A.B. can induce it as and when we wants, that's a different issue.
  • In 2005 at the age of 22, having never gone outside on her own
  • and despite believing she could be killed by Jackie
  • Katie decided to take the risk and made a break for it.
  • How did you get out of the house? By the back door. And then just carrying lots of
  • bags and things. And somebody saw me and said, do you need any help your bags?
  • so I said no but i've run away from home, so they said so I said what do i do?
  • they said go to the police station, so I did. Tell me what happened when you entered
  • the police station? So they persuaded me to let them call Bala and so then he came
  • Balakrishnan reassured the police that all was well and took Katie back to The
  • Collective where she remained in captivity for another eight years.
  • A.B. did say that he likes to discuss things and query things, why things are done like
  • this or like that, but he says that if it's gone more than two or three times and he
  • he resorts to, you know, slapping you, or you know, on the face you see and
  • something sometimes other parts as well, so he yes it did happen, it did took place.
  • So you were beaten? I was, Yes. Was everybody beaten? I would have thought so. Yes
  • These are outrageous allegations everywhere within every if anybody know or humiliate anybody know I dishing out the thirty board he didn't do that to me
  • and yeah you never saw anything like no I didn't
  • Every aspect of life in The Collective was neatly timetabled and logged in
  • handwritten rotas, including Balakrishnan's baths and meals
  • But over time the daily schedule evolved. Previously only Balakrishnan and his
  • wife had had access to the television but now all the comrades were allowed to
  • watch selected programs including the 6 o'clock news. Would you discuss the news
  • with him, would you discuss world events with him? He would discuss with us. So he
  • would talk and you would listen.? Sounds like there wasn't much discussion because
  • discretion means people exchanging ideas. That's right. But actually he talked and
  • you listened naturally there's no discussion about no
  • In her late twenties, Katie suffering from undiagnosed diabetes began to
  • rapidly lose weight. Terrified that a third member of The Collective might die,
  • Josie committed to memory a helpline number she'd seen on the news.
  • the BBC action itv recorded information
  • Josie saved money in secret smuggled a mobile phone into the flat and in
  • protracted discussions with the helpline put together an escape plan it was
  • arranged that Katie and Josie would leave when Balakrishnan and Chanda were out
  • shopping
  • So 11:15 sharp, we left, Josie and me with our trolleys.
  • I had no intention of leaving you know in fact leaving the collective for me was really
  • sort of like breaking my heart really but I could see that she needed help
  • so you know she asked me to go with her so I agreed to do it
  • i regret it very much now but at that time I didn't think that it will all
  • blow up like it did
  • As Katie and Josie made their way to freedom, Aisha choose to stay in the
  • collective and was there when Balakrishnan and Chanda came back
  • He was denouncing Katie and Josie and saying that now they have jointed British
  • fascist state and all these things so time for lunch were actually a good
  • lunch so we said we were seated sitting down to have lunch when the police came
  • a to the police I come with them but as I was coming out I saw Chanda and one
  • day I went and hugged them whatever I you know my misgivings I have them leave
  • the other last time I saw the motion that's our memories very sad for you
  • tree that very sad for you when you remember that you look upset about it
  • emotion so if you've been with them for forty years so and they were like family
  • really you
  • in the course of the police investigation all charges against Bala
  • Krishna's wife Chanda were dropped but new charges were brought against Bala
  • Krishnan himself it emerged that as well as having had sex with Sean Bala
  • Krishnan had sexually abused two other women over a period of years both of
  • whom had fled the collective by the early 19th the first incident with MS a
  • was when she was called into mr. Bhalla Krishna's bedroom it had never happened
  • before she didn't know why and without warning he kissed her mr. Bala Krishnan
  • then began to summon is a to his bedroom and where the sexual abuse that had
  • begun with a kiss then became a more extreme in nature and became sexual
  • abuse involving oral sex forcing her to perform oral sex upon him and thereafter
  • of sexual intercourse rape the serious sexual abuse of that type continued and
  • involved in addition the defendant ordering her to lick his anus she did as
  • she was ordered notwithstanding the distress that plainly she was exhibiting
  • one of the women who testified in court that when she tried to leave this woman
  • a were special scored in court when she tried to leave
  • she said that Shawn and O and Josie and you all held her down while Bala beat
  • her is that true cause I don't think I was there I mean I
  • might have been there but not holding her down like that for a B to beat her
  • son but in another way if that was true I shall would you feel able to tell me
  • or would it be too shameful I would tell you if I had done it you know I would
  • also be able to tell you why I did it but it was against me to do it it was
  • against my instinct to do it you know so that means she's lying she might have
  • she might have thought I was there because all three of them you know if it
  • Shawn Yoshi and O was hooking her down and I was there she might thought that
  • was also picking a ton I doubt that even three of them there you don't need three
  • people to you know maybe just Shawn was working it down because a B doesn't need
  • anybody to be holding anybody for her in to you feel smack on the face
  • and from the spell of of the cult Haifa is now 72 and is living in sheltered
  • housing what any aspect of fallows political experiment with any aspect of
  • that success would you say I think that the issue about loving somebody was not
  • your own I think that is the success that every child has the right to live
  • properly to be loved to be cared you see there's a contradiction Eliza because
  • Tyler's gone to prison for abusing Katie yes but I mean we now know how cake
  • cakey felt a party and individual we know not to do that
  • if you can't find a new weight and you carry on with the old I suppose but
  • surely the old hasn't worked so we still have to find what respective
  • katie is doing her best to leave the job of her past behind she's attending
  • college and has recently moved out of supported accommodation into a flash of
  • her own when she first came yeah she was 30 years old in the way we measure age
  • but she wasn't me she was much probably nearly to 10 or 11 or something like
  • that but we've almost seen this journey through the ages of thinking and I think
  • she's getting very close to a numerical edge now

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| January 2017

| http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08c3vrx
| http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08c3vrx/the-cult-next-door

| http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-b0af7ef5-1031-4e1f-a3ac-b3c21ef0f932
| https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/jan/22/katy-morgan-davies-interview-balakrishnan-cult-brixton-survivor
| http://www.telegraph.co.uk/tv/2017/01/26/cult-next-door-poignant-study-lives-lost-aravindan-balakrishnans/

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Leader had an invented machine. JACKIE or Jehovah Allah Christ Krishna Immortal Easwaran. The deluded leader was convicted and jailed.

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