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Pawn Stars: The Greatest Pawn on Earth! (Season 14, Episode 27) | Full Episode | History

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Oct 04, 2019

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Pawn Stars: The Greatest Pawn on Earth! (Season 14, Episode 27) | Full Episode | History
Pawn Stars: The Greatest Pawn on Earth! (Season 14, Episode 27) | Full Episode | History thumb Pawn Stars: The Greatest Pawn on Earth! (Season 14, Episode 27) | Full Episode | History thumb Pawn Stars: The Greatest Pawn on Earth! (Season 14, Episode 27) | Full Episode | History thumb

Transcription

  • [upbeat music]
  • - A buddy of mine who buys and sells
  • classic cars gave me a call.
  • He's got a 1966 Charger with a Hemi.
  • That's right. I said "Hemi."
  • And when you have a car that's originally with a Hemi,
  • it's super rare, so I'm interested.
  • [laughs]
  • Hey, what's up, man?
  • - How are you? - Doing good.
  • So this is it, huh? - This is it.
  • - It's got a Hemi? - Hemi.
  • It's numbers-matching transmission, engine.
  • It's the real deal.
  • - Yeah, and it's got a Hemi.
  • [laughter]
  • [engine revs]
  • - This 1966 Charger, it's not something you're
  • gonna see every day.
  • It may have some special NASCAR parts on it that
  • we are not 100% sure of the authenticity of it,
  • but it is one of those cars that may be worth
  • hundreds of thousands of dollars.
  • - That's cool.
  • The core charge on a Hemi is $15,000.
  • I mean, for a junk one it's worth 15,000.
  • - Oh, yeah, I mean, yeah, just finding the motor, I mean--
  • I get Hemis in cars that don't belong in them,
  • and people just try to buy the motor out of them.
  • - Yeah, but, um, this is a car that was sort of race ready.
  • Hemi, stick shift, which means it probably doesn't have AC.
  • Does it even have power steering?
  • - Uh, it does not, no.
  • - Okay. - Ready to race.
  • - Yeah, because they were marketed like, you know,
  • that you could go in the dealership and buy yourself
  • a real NASCAR right off the showroom floor.
  • You know, guys intended on racing them.
  • - Exactly.
  • - They cared about how it looked, and then
  • they figured aerodynamics later.
  • ♪ ♪
  • - So, Rick, it was redone...
  • we're guessing probably in the early '80s, late '70s.
  • - Okay.
  • It's not the original interior, but, I mean,
  • it's close, I think.
  • Um, thank God he didn't change the shifting knob to a skull.
  • - Yes. - [laughs]
  • ♪ ♪
  • Is there anything else you know about it?
  • - There's some rumors and kind of folklore
  • about this particular car, that it may have been
  • a NASCAR production car, which there were only
  • 85 of those made ever.
  • It could make this car worth a lot of money.
  • - That's incredible.
  • The odd thing about this car is it could be
  • one of the 85 Chargers made in 1966 for NASCAR.
  • It sort of looks that way just due to the fact that there's
  • no power steering, there's no air conditioning,
  • no power locks, no power windows, and that's
  • the kind of car that they would've made for NASCAR.
  • It's super rare.
  • ♪ ♪
  • How much you want for it?
  • - It's a rare bird. It's--There's not a lot
  • to compare it to, so I'm gonna put it out there at 135.
  • ♪ ♪
  • - Do you mind if I call up my buddy Bill
  • and take a look at it?
  • - Yeah, absolutely.
  • - All right, I-I'm intrigued.
  • I mean, it's in really, really good shape.
  • Give me a few minutes. I'm gonna go give someone
  • a call, okay? - Okay, sounds good.
  • It's always good to have another expert opinion
  • on the car.
  • Another expert would definitely help.
  • [cash register dings]
  • ♪ ♪
  • [cash register dings]
  • ♪ ♪
  • - Hey, how you doing? - Good, and you?
  • - Pretty good. What can I help you with?
  • - I brought you a special sword.
  • - What's so special about this sword?
  • - Well, this is the best Napoleonic swords ever made.
  • It's an Imperial Guard sword.
  • This would've belonged to a dragoon.
  • - What's a dragoon?
  • - Mounted artillery.
  • - I'm gonna call my boss "dragoon" from now on.
  • - [laughs] - You dragoon!
  • [unsheathing sword rings out]
  • - A Napoleonic Imperial sword is a sword
  • used by Napoleon's elite regiments.
  • I have many swords, and I'm trying
  • to simplify a little bit.
  • I would like to sell this sword today, and, if I'm able
  • to sell it, I would like to take the proceeds
  • and take my wife for a European vacation.
  • - It looks cool.
  • - And if I could pull it out? - Yeah, go ahead, take it out.
  • ♪ ♪
  • So this is an Imperial Guard sword, huh?
  • - This is an Imperial Guard sword.
  • - The Imperial Guard is one of the most famous forces
  • ever in Europe.
  • - You could compare them today to the--our Special Forces.
  • That's what they were.
  • - Yeah, Napoleon, he was known for having
  • his Imperial Guards stand around him.
  • You could--You would always know where he was because
  • you could see the formation of Imperial Guards moving around,
  • and, um, I know some of them were so loyal they even
  • followed him out when he got exiled.
  • - Yeah, yes, they did.
  • ♪ ♪
  • - Mind if I look at it? - Yes.
  • ♪ ♪
  • - So what are these markings right here?
  • What's that say? S&K?
  • - That's S&K. S&K is the maker.
  • Schnitzler and Kirschbaum.
  • And it was made in Solingen, Germany.
  • So the Germans were actually enemies of Napoleon.
  • - So Napoleon's enemies were making his weapons, huh?
  • - Yes, and this sword is very well-preserved.
  • The scabbard, for the leather, for being over 200 years old,
  • is very well-preserved.
  • - Yeah, that's-- For 200-year-old leather,
  • it does look pretty well-preserved.
  • I mean, I've seen hundred-year-old leather
  • falling apart, cracking. - Yes.
  • - How much are you looking to get?
  • - $5,800.
  • - Okay, um, I would like to have someone come down
  • and take a look at it and see what they have to say.
  • They can talk about the condition and whether or not
  • they think this is a Napoleonic sword.
  • You don't strike me for a liar, but, hey, you never know.
  • - [laughs] - I gotta have my guy come down
  • and--and tell me what this is.
  • - Absolutely. - All right, give me
  • just a few minutes. I'm gonna make a phone call
  • and see if I can get him down here.
  • - Thank you.
  • I am not worried about the expert because
  • I've been collecting Napoleonic swords for many,
  • many years, and I am actually an expert myself.
  • ♪ ♪
  • ♪ ♪
  • ♪ ♪
  • - Hey, Dragoon. - Hey, Chum.
  • Chumlee called me down to the shop because
  • they've got a Napoleonic-era sword,
  • and he wants to make sure that that sword is the real thing,
  • and I'm really looking forward to it.
  • Wow. - Yeah, this is what
  • I called you about.
  • - That's beautiful.
  • You don't often see the entire scabbard.
  • - Right, right, right. - You see them cracked
  • or folding down here. - Yep.
  • - Just smashed and flat at the end.
  • May I? - Yeah.
  • - Okay.
  • ♪ ♪
  • Ah, so, this sword is a cuirassier's,
  • or a heavy cavalry officer's sword,
  • and it's a presentation sword.
  • This was probably given to somebody after
  • they did something or when they were promoted
  • or something like that.
  • I like the fact that it's got the S&K mark on that.
  • - Yeah. - And that's the maker,
  • and they were a German maker that just made excellent blades.
  • What I would've loved to have seen on this
  • was the bluing. - The bluing.
  • - Was the bluing just, like, a finish or something?
  • - Yeah, like gun bluing. - Mm-hmm.
  • - So it has this beautiful blue sheen
  • that just makes the gold pop out,
  • all the etching in the gold pop out.
  • But this is in beautiful condition.
  • And look at that.
  • - Look, I mean, look-- look at the way that thing fits.
  • - That's like a jeweler's fit right there.
  • - Yeah. - And that's what you wanna see.
  • You wanna see these-- Everything fit,
  • no wonkiness, no looseness. - Mm-hmm.
  • - Now, this sword is definitely the real deal.
  • - Okay, so what price would you put on this particular sword?
  • ♪ ♪
  • - What you have with this one that makes it
  • a really nice piece is you have the complete scabbard
  • in excellent condition.
  • The only thing that I would-- I would love to see
  • on this blade better is that bluing on the blade...
  • - Sure. - And a little bit less
  • of that rust, so I'd say maybe 39.
  • - All right, well, thank you. - All right, thank you.
  • It's a beautiful piece. It's in wonderful condition.
  • And these Napoleonic pieces are some of the most
  • highly collected swords.
  • - What do you think about 2,300?
  • ♪ ♪
  • - No, this is the best sword that was ever made for--
  • for the Grand Armée.
  • I cannot part for this less than $3,700.
  • - I'll tell you what. Let's be a couple dragoons.
  • 2,700. - I can't.
  • - Okay, um, 3,000 is firm where I can be.
  • - I'll do 3,300, but it--I--
  • I don't even feel right doing 3,300.
  • - I don't wanna make you do something you don't wanna do.
  • - Yeah. - So, if we can't come to a deal
  • for 3,000. - We can't, we cannot.
  • - I appreciate you.... - We cannot, no.
  • - Bringing it in, and it was... - Thank you.
  • - Very cool. - Thank you.
  • - All right, have a good day. - You too.
  • I will put this sword back in my library
  • and display it and remember my dragoon friend, Chumlee.
  • - My buddy Ryan has this car. It's a 1966 Dodge Charger.
  • This might be one of those cars that was made specifically
  • for NASCAR, so I'm calling in Bill 'cause if Bill can prove
  • this is a car that was made for NASCAR, oh, I'm buying it.
  • - This is the beast you were talking about, huh?
  • - Yes, it's the 1966 Hemi.
  • - Yeah, these things are cool, man.
  • A lot of them really didn't go with the big motor
  • because this is in the beginning of the muscle car era.
  • Dodge is a little bit late to the game because, you know,
  • they did start making their cars a little bit smaller,
  • but what they did is they just threw big, giant motor in it.
  • - I mean, you could throw a party in this thing.
  • - Actually, the back seats are designed to fold down
  • for plywood, so this is also a work truck.
  • [laughter]
  • - So is it a NASCAR car?
  • - So that's the tough question.
  • So how far can you do the genealogy on the car?
  • Like who was the owners and all that stuff?
  • - Well, we do have the original IBM card,
  • the original window sticker that shows what it was.
  • - The question is, on the NASCAR options,
  • were the NASCAR options available?
  • Check off the box option on the IBM card?
  • - It doesn't show that as something available.
  • - Okay, back in those days, the guy that bought
  • and checked off every option, he keeps all that paperwork.
  • So usually cars that are super rare,
  • a lot of times, unless it's a barn find,
  • it's--it's gonna have a lot of documentation with it.
  • Can we take her out and put her thought her paces?
  • - Can we? - Yeah, yeah, let's do it.
  • - All right, let's go for a spin.
  • - Let's check it out.
  • ♪ ♪
  • [engine revs]
  • - So... - The motor doesn't sound bad.
  • - No, it doesn't sound bad.
  • ♪ ♪
  • - I mean, as far as a design for a car,
  • I like the interior. - It's cool.
  • I mean, it's all got a crazy look to it.
  • You know, everything's, like, super futuristic.
  • On some of these old cars, you've got gauges
  • that aren't so accurate.
  • - Yeah, well, the oil pressure gauge was just an idiot light.
  • The gauge really didn't do anything.
  • - When the thing came on, you're out of oil, idiot.
  • [laughter]
  • [engine revs]
  • - How was it?
  • - All in all, it's a pretty good ride.
  • - Good. - It feels like a '66, you know?
  • Big car, skinny tires, a little sketchy.
  • Luckily, it wasn't raining, but, I mean, all in all,
  • feels like a solid '66. - Good.
  • - What do you think it's worth? - It's a rare car to begin with.
  • The Hemi Charger in '66, there's not a ton of these made.
  • I mean, they're there, but you don't see them
  • for sale all the time.
  • Because of the year, you know, the collectability is probably
  • gonna be more of a-- a C or a B collectability.
  • You know, if they were '68s, '69s,
  • it's a whole different ball game with these cars.
  • You're now funneling down
  • to really small segments of collectors.
  • - Mm-hmm. - This car, it can only
  • be valued as what it is as it sits here today.
  • With all the paperwork and the mystery involved...
  • ♪ ♪
  • I'm saying this car could bring 50 to 60 grand at auction.
  • - Close to 200 if it's proved to be a NASCAR.
  • - Yeah, if it's proven that that's a true, real option,
  • it could be a $200,000 car.
  • If you're looking for the Holy Grail of vehicles,
  • without that piece of paper, you just don't get there.
  • - Thank you. - Hey, thanks.
  • - Good seeing you. - Good seeing you.
  • There's a small club of people that really want
  • to buy a '66 Charger.
  • It's got all the bells and whistles.
  • For those guys, this is the car, but, for Rick,
  • it's not the unicorn.
  • - The way it sits, I give you 50 grand.
  • - Oh... - I mean--
  • I mean there is the possibility
  • it's a 200,000-plus car. - Or more, yeah.
  • - But, I mean, it's just finding the paperwork,
  • if it's even findable.
  • - I agree, but I'm gonna stick around 135.
  • If it was quick sale right now, I'd probably do closer to 100.
  • I don't know. We might be still, too,
  • a little far off.
  • - Yeah, it sounds like we're way too far off.
  • - [laughs] - If you do find
  • the documentation, give me a call.
  • I got some customers... - Yeah.
  • - Who would be interested in that.
  • All right,
  • have a good one, man. - Thanks, Rick.
  • At this point, I'm gonna take the car,
  • put it in our showroom, advertise it on the Internet,
  • also take our own experts and get some more documentation
  • on it, and hopefully get the big money for it.
  • ♪ ♪
  • ♪ ♪
  • - Hi. - Hey, what do we got here?
  • - P.T. Barnum's autobiography,
  • dated 1874.
  • - Well, damn, that's pretty cool.
  • He was always a promoter, and he knew how to make money,
  • and that's where the famous line "A sucker's born every minute"
  • came from. - I know, yeah.
  • - All right, ladies and gentlemen, step right up!
  • - My name's Bob. I brought a P.T. Barnum
  • autobiography in to try to sell.
  • It's a neat piece I've had for over 30 years.
  • I'm getting up there, and I just wanna pass it on
  • to another generation.
  • I'm asking 1,500.
  • If I get the money for this, I got a son that's
  • just finishing up college, and it's just eating up money
  • like crazy.
  • ♪ ♪
  • - Um, yeah, P.T. Barnum.
  • He was, like, a really amazing guy.
  • He was just, like, the world's greatest showman and marketer.
  • I mean, he had great sayings like, you know,
  • "There's no such thing as bad publicity."
  • And, you know, he's quoted today in business school.
  • One of the greatest and craziest things
  • ever about him was the Cardiff Giant.
  • There was a guy in Upstate New York
  • who went to Iowa, had them carve a really,
  • really rough statue that was over ten feet tall
  • out of limestone.
  • They dug a giant hole, they threw it in it,
  • and told everybody that it was a petrified giant they had found,
  • and he was charging people to look at it.
  • - Mm-hmm. - Well, P.T. Barnum says,
  • "Well, I gotta go see this thing."
  • Goes up to Upstate New York, he looks at it and goes,
  • "Well, it's obviously fake, but how much you want for it?"
  • [laughs]
  • He ended up bringing it back to New York for his museum
  • and he was the one who invented, like,
  • the gift shop at the exit, so...
  • [laughs]
  • - He was a pretty amazing fellow.
  • - This is a paste-in right here.
  • - Right, well, this is a letter saying that he's directing
  • his publisher to send a copy to him, and then
  • you can cut this and put it in the book.
  • - Um, book's in fairly decent shape.
  • There's a little bit of foxing here and there.
  • There's a little bit of issues with the binding,
  • but overall it's in pretty good shape.
  • I mean, it looks like there was some water damage at one point.
  • - 145 years old.
  • - Not that old for a book.
  • - I guess so, I know.
  • - [laughs]
  • So how much you want for it?
  • - I'd like to get 1,500 for it.
  • ♪ ♪
  • - Okay, um, I have absolutely no clue, so, uh, let me have
  • a friend of mine look at it. - Sure.
  • - Greatest book person on Earth. - Okay.
  • - [laughs] I tried.
  • [laughs]
  • - Rick's gonna call in an expert.
  • I have no problem with that.
  • It's like a doctor. It's always great to have
  • a second opinion.
  • ♪ ♪
  • ♪ ♪
  • ♪ ♪
  • Hey! - Hey, Rick.
  • - The greatest book person on Earth.
  • - [laughs] - That didn't come out right.
  • - Sure, I'll take it.
  • - So we have P.T. Barnum... - Right.
  • - And, being the showman he is, puts his face
  • right on the binding. - Something you would never do.
  • - Mine would be much larger and in living color.
  • [laughs]
  • - See, I think you have a kindred spirit in Barnum.
  • - He was the world's greatest promoter.
  • - Right, and especially... - Okay?
  • - Self-promotion in the 19th century,
  • this was kind of a new thing.
  • P.T. Barnum was, in some ways, a one-man show.
  • He created all of these shows that were very elaborate
  • and sometimes bizarre, but he knew
  • that it would attract people, and he was all about promotion.
  • Barnum is one of the people who really pushes the boundaries
  • on this and, in some ways, sets the tone for promotion
  • in the 20th century.
  • - So it's sort of a signed book, but not a signed book.
  • - This is not a signed book. - Okay.
  • - It is a book with a signature tipped in.
  • The fact of the matter is, the way that collectors
  • look at it is "Did he physically have hands on this book?"
  • And, when you have something pasted in,
  • he probably didn't touch this particular book.
  • In fact, he talks about how the publisher sent the book,
  • "And then you can paste in my signature."
  • - But if P.T. Barnum was here today,
  • he would say he touched the book.
  • [laughs]
  • So is this a first edition?
  • - All right, let's take a look at the title page.
  • ♪ ♪
  • So even without looking at the publication details,
  • I know it's not because it says, "Author's Edition."
  • Now, author's edition is what you say when you're
  • trying to put a good face on something that's
  • not a first edition. - Okay.
  • - Which is another way for him to be promoting himself.
  • Like, "I know this isn't the first time this book
  • "came out, but you want this one too
  • because this is the author's edition."
  • That's all part of him being a self-promoter.
  • He wanted control over his image.
  • - Okay, so, I mean, the condition
  • looks pretty decent.
  • - It's not pristine, but, for a book like this
  • from this period, it's pretty nice.
  • - Okay, so is it worth a fortune?
  • - Technically, it's not first edition, and, technically,
  • the book itself is not signed, but it does have
  • the tipped-in signature with the kind of cool
  • extra detail there of how that came to be,
  • which I like.
  • So I would expect to see this in a bookstore
  • at a retail price of around 1,200.
  • - Okay, cool, you're the best. - Take care.
  • Pleasure. - Good-bye.
  • - He won't admit it, but I think Rick
  • thinks of himself as a 21st-century P.T. Barnum.
  • So you know he's gonna buy this book, and then
  • he's gonna look at that face on the spine,
  • and he's gonna imagine it being his face.
  • - All right, so, what would you take for it?
  • - I could probably do 950 on it.
  • - I'll give you 700 bucks.
  • - Oh, I-- - I mean, I-I gotta
  • make a living, I-- - I know--I realize you gotta
  • sell it, but, you know, I can keep it for that.
  • I've had it for 30 years, so I can.
  • - Okay, I mean, I'll go 750 on it.
  • I mean, I-I think that's a fair price.
  • I'm not getting rich off you.
  • - How about 850?
  • - I will go 825.
  • - Okay, you twisted my arm.
  • - All right, 825, it's a deal. - Okay, then.
  • - I'll meet you right up front. - All right.
  • - We'll do some paperwork, and I'll get you paid.
  • - Okay.
  • - Yeah, if it was me, it would be in color.
  • ♪ ♪
  • - I seen Rebecca here earlier.
  • You guys were nerding out over a book.
  • - I guess there is a sucker born every minute.
  • - Why am I a sucker?
  • The shop will make money on the book.
  • - It's a P.T. Barnum quote.
  • - I know it's a P.T. Barnum quote.
  • - Considering you've been a pawn broker
  • for most of your life, it fits.
  • - [sighs]
  • There's other ones like, uh, "There's no such thing
  • as bad publicity." - I need a catchphrase.
  • Right, so what do you guys think?
  • - Catchphrases are one of those things that just sort of pop up.
  • You just don't make one. They just sort of appear.
  • I don't know exactly how to explain it.
  • - Create one for me.
  • - "Chumlee: I don't read books." [laughs]
  • - "That's the stupidest thing we've ever bought."
  • - That could almost be a catchphrase.
  • I'll give you that.
  • - Corey's catchphrase would be "What the hell is that?"
  • - [laughs]
  • - Chums, you can create your own catchphrase.
  • I'm gonna go with "You got Chummed."
  • [laughter]
  • - But that's not a catchphrase.
  • ♪ ♪

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Catch the new season of Pawn Stars 10/21 at 10/9c!

P. T. Barnum’s autobiography shows up in the shop. Rick tries to solve a mystery over a rare Dodge Charger. A Napoleonic era sword falls into Chum’s hands in Season 14, Episode 27, "The Greatest Pawn on Earth!".
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"Pawn Stars" follows three generations of the Harrison family as they assess the value of items coming in and out of their Gold & Silver Pawn Shop in Las Vegas, from the commonplace to the truly historic.

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