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Neapolitan pizza at home by Davide Civitiello

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11:13   |   Sep 15, 2017

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Neapolitan pizza at home by Davide Civitiello
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  • Hi friends, I'm Davide Civitiello. Today we're in Naples, precisely in
  • Posillipo. Today we'll see if it's possible to make a good Neapolitan style pizza at home.
  • Normally, the ingredients are four: water, salt, yeast and
  • flour. To make it at home in an electric oven, though, where we don't reach 480°C
  • but we have an oven at the maximum temperature,
  • we're using two ingredients more: oil and sugar. Oil helps us to obtain
  • a crisper pizza, as the cooking time is much longer
  • when compared with a wood oven and the sugar, that helps us with the browning
  • without affecting the leavening. Before we begin, we need to
  • start the oven and put a refractory stone inside
  • our oven. To cook a nice pizza, we need three elements. First
  • the oven conduction, meaning a very hot oven
  • second, the contact between the dough and the refractory stone, third the irradiation
  • of heat coming from above. These are the three elements
  • that allow us to cook a tasty pizza at home.
  • Another key element to make a good dough is this: I use a handmade dough tray made by
  • an artisan from Somma Vesuviana, but you can do it at home in a bowl,
  • or in a stand mixer, as you prefer. I'm using the most
  • traditional ways possible, so I start right where I was born: the dough tray.
  • Let's open the dough tray. First, we added some water and flour
  • in order to seal the open parts to prevent water from dripping.
  • Let's now add the first ingredients inside the dough tray.
  • We're using a classic Caputo flour with a medium protein content
  • allowing a leavening from 6 to 8 hours at home, as well.
  • Then, let's add a liter of water. Usually one liter absorbs around
  • 1 to 1,6 kg flour. Let's add salt and start melting it in the water.
  • Then, let's add yeast to the flour. Yeast
  • should always be in contact with flour for two simple reasons: first, flour
  • is always at a temperature 18 to 22°C and, moreover, contains sugars that
  • are food for the yeast: glucose and maltose. Salt, instead, should never
  • contact the yeast because salt absorbs
  • water and it would drink up all of the enzymes water, killing them.
  • It's fundamental to melt salt in the water before, so that
  • salt and yeast don't contact each other. Let's start stirring the first 4 ingredients
  • as we said: water, salt, yeast and flour. Let's add half of the
  • flour as it could change according to the climate: it could be
  • more wet or dry, etc... So let's start with half of it
  • and create a first mix, then we're gradually adding
  • the sugar. The direction is always from the bottom to top, then pull down.
  • With the other hand, start adding sugar. You can feel the dough,
  • you can almost listen to it while working it. Let's now add oil.
  • We're adding it now as we're now kneading with the hands. Those who
  • are using a stand mixer can add it two or three minutes before the end.
  • With a machine, oil absorption is easier.
  • We're now doing it by hand, so we're adding it now.
  • We're slowly adding the remaining flour. Let's take another kg of flour.
  • As we said, a liter of water absorbs around 1,6 to 1,7 kg
  • of flour. "Around", as it's never a precise measure.
  • Water stays always a single liter, so you can adjust better at home:
  • One liter of water is around 8-11 pizzas. Half a liter of water is around 5-7 pizzas.
  • You can adjust to the dose you prefer: if there's five of you
  • you can use half a liter of water; if there's ten of you, you can use a liter.
  • As you can see, we're starting to obtain a solid and uniform dough.
  • Let's always add flour gradually up until the right point. A tip:
  • for the oven at home use a dough that is very hydrated, suitable
  • for long cookings. On the stone, the cooking time
  • is about 5/6 minutes, so we need water
  • inside our dough. While we continue to mix the ingredients
  • we'll suddenly obtain a solid dough.
  • If we clean our hands a bit with some flour - pizza chefs say
  • cleaning the hands when using flour - then we're finishing our dough
  • right on the countertop. Let's start kneading with both hands
  • as you can see, we'll start working on gluten:
  • the dough becomes increasingly elastic. For all types of dough, be it pizza, bread
  • or anything else, the kneading time should last from 15 to 20 minutes, by hand
  • some minutes more are recommended, as we're not using the strenght of the machine,
  • but our hands. Let's continue to knead
  • until we obtain a uniform, smooth and elastic dough.
  • After 20 minutes, let's uncover our dough to proceed to the second phase:
  • the cutting. Let's first cut a loaf of dough. Let's round it.
  • Then, in this way, like I do in the pizzeria. One!
  • Here's the first stick. The second is like making a mozzarella, in this way.
  • You can do it at home with a knife or with this type of spatula
  • cut pieces of dough of the same weight, normally the diameter
  • is between 28 and 32 cms, for a weight of 250 gr. I recommend to
  • make them smaller at home, anyway, to cook them quicker in the oven.
  • Once you cut them, you can play with them and obtain the same result.
  • What really matters is not technique, but the final result.
  • Our final result should be 8/9 sticks, or maybe 10
  • it depends from the dough - of the same weight and nicely round, to make 8-9 pizzas.
  • If we're doing it smaller, you can have 10/11 of them, it depends from
  • the bulk you decide at home. Once we cover it, we're letting it raise for 6 to 8 hours.
  • Then we're proceeding to the third phase. Let's prepare the tomato
  • traditionally, as well, working with the hands
  • as I'm doing, or using a coarse vegetable mill.
  • Tomato for a nice Neapolitan pizza, first of all
  • shouldn't be cooked, but has to be eaten raw not to lose
  • flavor, pulp, humidity, seeds and everything it contains inside.
  • What you shouldn't do is blend the tomato,
  • as we're blending all of the good it contains and we're just making
  • a sauce, a tomato water that will evaporate with the cooking, leaving nothing on the pizza!
  • Let's now salt our tomato
  • as you can see, the tomato is whole. Every 100 gr tomato, a single gram salt.
  • Two kgs and a half, 25 grams.
  • Let's add some basil leaf and break them. A drizzle of olive oil. We're obtaining
  • a tomato that is, first, savory. If we're making it before, it's better
  • to let basil release flavor. The oil gives flavor,
  • as well as shine on the pizza. If you don't know it,
  • pizza is eaten through eyes, as well! The mozzarella, an Agerola fiordilatte here,
  • is cut with a knife and not with some other machines that would
  • separate milk from mozzarella. We're cutting it like this,
  • into thin sticks. It's very important not to cut mozzarella
  • too thin or too coarse. In this case,
  • mozzarella is medium cut for two simple reasons:
  • if we cut it too thin, it's going to dehydrate and can burn
  • losing all of its humidity. If we're cutting it too coarse,
  • the humidity can't evaporate and there'll be a lot of water in the pizza.
  • In this case, mozzarella gets stringy. After 6 to 8 hours leavening
  • we'll notice that the dough has doubled its volume, like
  • in this case. We're ready for the third phase, the rolling out.
  • The first trick in Neapolitan pizza is to work it as little as you can. It's a usual mistake
  • to work it too much and stress it. Let's wet our hands a bit first
  • and lightly wet the dough without rolling it out in the flour
  • it's very important. Let's place our hands in this way:
  • crossing the two fingers first and then moving our hands closer. One, two, three
  • then turn and one, two, three... then turn. As you can see, we alredy obtained a uniform border.
  • It can be used to contain the ingredients. Let's not roll it out too much
  • and neither too little. Let's take our peel to help us put
  • our pizza in the oven at home. You can find it in the household shops, together with the
  • refractory stone to place in the oven. A light drizzle of flour on the
  • pizza, not too much to prevent it
  • from turning yelllow and bitter. Let's place the pizza on it
  • as you can see, I just worked it two times, very few
  • and we're now adding the ingredients on top. Let's make sure it can lightly move, first
  • then we're adding the tomato in the centre, just a bit more than a spoon
  • not too much, two spoons are too much as the more liquid we're adding on the pizza,
  • the more it won't turn out uniform, the water doesn't evaporate properly.
  • We're turning it in a spiral fashion until the border, without going further
  • as if we drip out of it, it could stick on the peel, making it difficut to move it.
  • It's very important to stay inside the border.
  • Let's add mozzarella. The goal is to eat a pizza with mozzarella,
  • not the other way round. Let's add the right dose
  • that is around 70 - 80 gr for a home pizza, fresh basil and
  • extra virgin olive oil, creating the famous "six of the pizzaiolo".
  • We're now ready to cook it. Let's open the home oven
  • that is already hot and gently make the pizza slide
  • on the refractory stone. With a usual Neapolitan oven, in a classic
  • Neapolitan pizzeria, it takes 90 seconds. For a home oven with refractory stone, it's 5 - 6 minutes.
  • After 5 -6 minutes cooking, it's ready to be eaten!
  • Here's our Neapolitan pizza in a home oven.
  • Ready to be eaten! Buon appetito everybody by Davide Civitiello!
  • So, is it possible to make a Neapolitan style pizza at home?

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Can you make a true Neapolitan pizza in your oven at home? Davide Civitiello is a world champion pizza chef and he has no doubts: it's possible! Follow his recipe to uncover all of his secrets and... good luck!