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Growing Jasmine (Jasminum sambac) - How to Grow Jasmine

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06:25   |   Nov 25, 2016

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Growing Jasmine (Jasminum sambac) - How to Grow Jasmine
Growing Jasmine (Jasminum sambac) - How to Grow Jasmine thumb Growing Jasmine (Jasminum sambac) - How to Grow Jasmine thumb Growing Jasmine (Jasminum sambac) - How to Grow Jasmine thumb

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  • Hi, my name is Byron Martin, here at
  • Logee's Greenhouses, and today, we're
  • going to be talking about Jasmines, in
  • particular, the Sambacs. Within the Sambac
  • group there are many, many, cultivars.
  • We have five of them here, that we
  • grow at Logee's. They're quite easy to
  • grow, and they are probably some of the
  • freest-flowering ones, particularly the
  • 'Maid of Orleans,' but many of them are
  • very free-flowering. And they carry a very
  • strong Jasmine fragrance, particularly at
  • night. As I mentioned, the most famous of
  • them all is the 'Maid of Orleans,' which is
  • this, here, and you can see how prolific
  • the flowering is on it. That is probably
  • the freest-flowering of all, within the
  • group. One of the things about growing
  • this plant, in particular, is that, it
  • flowers, always off of the new shoots, as
  • they all do, but this one- every little
  • spur, a flower will come off of.
  • So in culturing it, they really like to
  • be pruned, and in that case, we just
  • simply shear back any long leads that are
  • coming off the plant, and it immediately
  • goes back into growth, and flowers form on
  • that new growth. All of them have that
  • tendency, the flowers always form on the
  • new growth, but some of them tend to be a
  • little more upright in their growth. This
  • is 'Grand Duke,' and there are several forms of
  • 'Grand Duke.' This is one selection that is
  • more common in the trade; it's a lot
  • easier to flower and propagate than some
  • of the others. You can see the flowers
  • are very double, almost like carnations.
  • This one, actually, is starting to crest,
  • meaning, it's getting a thick, sort of a
  • sideways growth to it. This particular
  • variety-- all of them can be used as tea, but
  • this particular one is often-- the flowers
  • are picked in the evening and put into
  • water in the refrigerator overnight and
  • in the morning, you drink Jasmine water-- but all
  • of them can be used that way. 'Grand Duke'
  • is one that's often used for that. This
  • has a very upright habit to it; you can
  • see these leads are running up and they
  • will go, continue to go up, until they get
  • to a point where they flower. In terms of
  • culturing of them, if they get too long,
  • just prune them back. I mean,
  • it can-- it's a plant that can, actually,
  • get out of hand.
  • It doesn't have as much vigor,
  • in terms of growing throughout
  • the season, as the-- as 'Maid of Orleans'
  • does, so, it's more of a warm-day bloomer
  • than it is wintertime. We very seldom see
  • flowers in the wintertime here in Northeastern
  • Connecticut. Within that group,
  • there's also another double. This is sort
  • of almost the difference between the two.
  • This is one we call 'Flore Plena.' It has a
  • semi-double to double flower to it; a little
  • bit looser than 'Grand Duke;' an upright
  • habit, but it does flower very freely. It
  • is more of a summer-bloomer for us, but
  • it does flower a little bit freer than
  • 'Grand Duke.' One other cultivar that we
  • grow is called 'Belle of India.' This is a
  • double form; you can see it's very, very loose in
  • its growth. This is probably-- I wouldn't say
  • weakest, but, it tends to be more seasonal
  • than any of the others-- really doesn't
  • like winter time here in the North and
  • pretty much slows down, on us, to a crawl,
  • or stops growing, even under warm
  • conditions. And then, in summertime, it
  • grows very vigorously. But, you can see it has
  • kind of a reaching habit to it; it kind
  • of-- more vining, than some of the others.
  • In terms of culture, they do have some
  • issues with root disease, so one
  • needs to make sure that there's some
  • dryness between waterings. They are
  • highly susceptible to spidermite, and
  • that's probably the biggest challenge
  • in growing them; you got really keep
  • your eye on that. When you see that
  • little puckering mark on the leaf, you
  • need to make sure you treat them, and
  • take care of that, and the neem oil works
  • very well, in terms of controlling that,
  • but you just gotta stay ahead of that.
  • As far as pruning goes-- this would be a good
  • example-- we could prune this back, but
  • you just simply need to take these--
  • regardless of the variety-- once it's done
  • its flowering cycle-- here's some flowers that
  • have finished blooming here-- and simply
  • just chop the plant back so that
  • it's headed down, like so. And then, this
  • is all going to-- this is all going to
  • break and it will fill out again, and
  • you're going to-- every time you do that,
  • as you prune, with most plants-- you're going to thicken it.
  • So, that creates a fuller specimen
  • over time, and it also-- you can contain it.
  • You could certainly take a Jasmine 'Maid
  • of Orleans,' like this, and you could hold it at,
  • I don't know, maybe a foot and a half
  • tall, permanently-- just by pruning it off,
  • letting it grow, pruning it off, letting it
  • grow-- so it can fit on a windowsill, or in
  • a limited space, if needed. As far as
  • fertilizer goes, they do benefit from
  • fertilizer. We feed them on a pretty much-
  • a continuous basis throughout the year,
  • as long as temperatures are above 60
  • degrees, where we grow most of our
  • Jasmines. Any balanced feed will work; you
  • can use a liquid feed, or you can top
  • dress, if needed, with organics or
  • granular slow-release. There are some
  • issues in the wintertime with iron
  • chlorosis-- that's interveinal lightness--
  • yellowing of the top growth-- that's
  • usually an iron problem. Generally, it's
  • more of a seasonal thing. You can ignore
  • it and they'll grow out of it, or if you
  • want, you can treat with iron chelate, and
  • that usually corrects the problem. As I
  • mentioned, there can be some issues with
  • root disease on these plants,
  • particularly in cold, wet, conditions.
  • Jasmine 'Belle of India' tends to be more
  • susceptible than the other varieties
  • that we grow. So thank you for watching
  • today. There's a little bit of
  • information on one of the easiest
  • Jasmines to grow-- the Jasmine sambac-- and
  • the most rewarding. If you'd like more
  • information, you can find us at Logees.com

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Description

Visit Logees.com to see our extensive selection of Jasmine plants:
https://www.logees.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=jasmine

Growing Jasmine (Jasmine Sambac) - These easy to grow Sambac varieties of Jasmine are some of the most free flowering and heavily scented jasmines in existence. Learn how to make Jasmine water and tea from these beloved flowers.

For more information on fruiting, rare and tropical plants, please visit us here:
http://www.logees.com