LOADING ...

Exploring a MASSIVE Spanish Supermarket

472K+ views   |   10K+ likes   |   510 dislikes   |  
25:20   |   Dec 21, 2018

Thumbs

Exploring a MASSIVE Spanish Supermarket
Exploring a MASSIVE Spanish Supermarket thumb Exploring a MASSIVE Spanish Supermarket thumb Exploring a MASSIVE Spanish Supermarket thumb

Transcription

  • - Mountains of ham, rivers of olive oil,
  • and lakes of wine.
  • Today we're gonna explore one of the largest supermarkets
  • in Madrid so I can show you what we eat, what we drink
  • in this country.
  • The wonderful unique Spanish snacks there are
  • and so you can also see how's it different
  • from your supermarket back home.
  • A typical Spanish supermarket so venga, let's go!
  • (medium tempo Spanish music)
  • Hey guys, I'm James Blick and welcome to Spain Revealed.
  • This channel is all about helping you explore and understand
  • Spain like a local.
  • And there's nothing more local than checking out
  • a supermarket in a country.
  • They're kinda like museums of current culture
  • if that makes any sense.
  • They reveal how we live our lives, what's important to us.
  • So we're gonna dive into this enormous supermarket.
  • But one of the concerns I have is
  • that we don't have permission to film,
  • I'm worried they might kick us out.
  • So we're gonna go guerrilla.
  • Yoly's filming on the iPhone
  • so we're going to pretend to shop normally
  • and try and show you what's going on inside.
  • And we're gonna keep it a little bit low key
  • and quiet, so shh, let's go in.
  • So it's like I'm walking through a ham jungle.
  • We eat so much ham in this country
  • and there is a section in the supermarket
  • purely for ham, I'm surrounded by it.
  • They're sweating, they look delicious.
  • All the different grades jamon serrano, jamon Iberico.
  • Of course, if you're here for a brief amount of time
  • stick to the Iberico, it's just so good.
  • A little more expensive.
  • And they also cut it by hand here for you.
  • So you have to choose your grade.
  • For the person who has everything,
  • you need to get them collapsible ham stands
  • so you can collapse it, have it at Christmas,
  • have your ham at Christmas and stick it in the spare room
  • collapsed for the rest of the year.
  • A lot of people just have a ham at home just at Christmas.
  • We've also got over here hams that come in boxes.
  • Oh so many ways you can buy ham.
  • Find the cheapest ham and the most expensive ham
  • so you can see the difference.
  • This one down here in front of me is from
  • the Alpujarra from Granada and it's 30 euros.
  • - [Yoly] 30 euros.
  • - For the whole ham.
  • - [Yoly] 30.
  • - So white-hoofed pig, serrano ham, probably not cured
  • that long, 30 euros for that whole thing.
  • That is, I don't think I've ever seen it that cheap.
  • Let's find the most expensive.
  • Okay, the most expensive is Cinco Jotas, 5J
  • you'll see it, and it's a ham here that is just the ham.
  • You also get some other cured meat with it
  • and a knife, but you're gonna pay 569 euros.
  • So that's a lot of, that's like a million percent more.
  • I'm sure it's not, but you get the idea.
  • 30 euros or 500 odd euros the difference.
  • So ham for everyone, for all budgets.
  • Of course it's not just ham or jamon
  • that we get from the pig.
  • You've got so many other forms of cured pork here.
  • There's one two, three, about three or four aisles
  • of cured pork products, packed up.
  • We eat a lot of pork in this country.
  • I'm not sure what the statistics are but it's insane.
  • For the person who loves cured meats at Christmas
  • serious envelope of this stuff, my god.
  • So to give you an idea of cured meat prices here
  • they can go pretty cheap,
  • five euros and you got 300 grams of a whole selection
  • here of ham, probably pretty average ham, chorizo,
  • salchichon, the whole deal.
  • But yeah I'd stick away from this stuff might be better off.
  • These are not tapas, just in case you're confused,
  • when you're arrive.
  • Small little crackers with nothing on them
  • are not tapas.
  • My favorite cured meats in this country
  • is a Catalan cured sausage called Fuet F-U-E-T.
  • It means whip in Catalan because
  • it's shaped like a whip and it's narrow.
  • But it is so yummy, perfect with wine.
  • Little slices, my god, once you start you cannot stop
  • and you'll eat the whole, the whole Fuet.
  • I been there, it's addictive.
  • Here's a paradox that I didn't understand in this country.
  • If you live in Spain, please let me know if you can
  • get me the inside pechuga de pavo, turkey breast.
  • You see it everywhere in this country in these slices,
  • but nobody eats turkey apart from this.
  • So you can't like buy turkey.
  • So we're eating all this turkey breast
  • and there's no turkeys, what are doing with the rest of it?
  • Is this turkey breast, is this turkey, please let me know
  • in the comments below, because I'm kind of fascinated.
  • I think there might be a conspiracy.
  • Hang on, I solved it.
  • There's another bit of turkey here.
  • Taquitos de pavo, little cubes of highly natural turkey.
  • So there it is, that's where the rest of it goes,
  • I guess, into taquitos.
  • We're got a deal on pig's brains 150 for two.
  • And a deal on pig's snout 160 for two.
  • So the snout's a little more expensive than the brain.
  • So funny that.
  • So you can see all the fish mongers behind me.
  • And I've always been so impressed by the fish sections
  • in supermarkets here in Spain.
  • There's so much variety.
  • Particularly a huge amount of variety also of prawns,
  • langostinos, all these different varieties.
  • They have all these different names in Spanish,
  • but in English we seem to have not as many names.
  • Maybe they are scientific names,
  • but really, really impressive.
  • And these guys, they will cut the fish up for you.
  • They'll scale it, they'll gut it, everything.
  • They'll ask you how you are gonna cook it.
  • So this is the pretty impressive selection.
  • Most of Spain's fresh seafood comes through the North
  • from the lonjas or the fishmarkets
  • in the North of the country particularly in Galicia.
  • So if you ever see these in a supermarket, gulas,
  • what they are are actually fake baby eel named after
  • angulas, which are real baby eels and are about
  • 1000 euros a kilo because they've been over fished.
  • So I think it was the 80's, a company made up these
  • fake ones, which are made from like surimi
  • like crab meat with a K.
  • And they are painted like baby eels.
  • Everyone knows they're fake.
  • - Not everyone know.
  • - Well not everyone, okay?
  • Not everyone knows they're fake.
  • And it says la authentica the authentic fake baby eel.
  • (Yoly laughs)
  • And particularly popular in the Basque Country,
  • in the North you do a stir fry with chili or garlic.
  • Strange little cultural thing.
  • So here we have a mixture of two types of anchovies
  • called a matrimonio or a marriage.
  • It's vinegar marinated anchovies and salt-cured anchovies.
  • And you actually often eat them together.
  • And that's why it's called the matrimonio
  • or marriage perfect when combined.
  • And they are sold shrink-wrapped and combined
  • and so I bet you don't have that back home.
  • Shrink-wrapped razor clams, shrink-wrapped razor clams,
  • that one's easier to say.
  • Sea snails anyone at 14.99 a kilo.
  • So I don't know how many little bunches
  • you need to make a kilo of sea snails,
  • but you find out when you come visit.
  • So I come from New Zealand,
  • where fresh milk is a religion.
  • And here when I moved to Spain it's all about UHT milk.
  • It means it lasts and doesn't have to be refrigerated.
  • It's the same in France as well.
  • So this fresh milk section here is tiny
  • and the UHT the pre-treated, pre-treated heat
  • however it's said is like two or three aisles of that stuff.
  • So what's the difference, more or less fat, I don't know.
  • When you come and it's Summer, drink horchata.
  • Ideally get the good horchata.
  • This is a little bit industrial,
  • but it's not the horchata
  • that you might think of from Mexico,
  • which I think is made with rice milk.
  • But this is from chufas or tiger nuts
  • and is the most refreshing drink in Summer.
  • Horchata, there's a lot of horchata here,
  • different flavors, different types.
  • Does your supermarket at home have pre-packaged pigs ear?
  • (Yoly laughs) I highly doubt it.
  • You can your rabbit whole or in bits.
  • So seven euros for a whole rabbit.
  • Bit of a big rabbit fan, but yeah, not bad.
  • Of course, the classic blood sausage.
  • Really do try it when you come here, it's delicious.
  • Especially the stuff with rice in it.
  • 270 for eight slices of blood sausage.
  • On the grill, really, really good, little bit crunchy.
  • And it's the new super food.
  • Blood sausage is the new kale.
  • Full of whatever it's full of, but it's good for you.
  • So give it to your kids.
  • When you're buying coffee in a supermarket,
  • you'll see mezcla mix or natural.
  • mezcla mix means that it's part natural coffee beans
  • been roasted naturally and part torrefacto,
  • which is a process where a little bit of sugar
  • is burnt onto the coffee beans.
  • It has a kind of a crazy history.
  • I'll put a link to an article down below about it.
  • But you want, in my opinion, natural,
  • the mezcla tastes really burned and hard.
  • And I love that it's called Bonka.
  • The whole mezcla natural thing just drove me bonkers
  • when I first moved here.
  • Because I was like why does
  • the coffee taste so terrible and I was buying mezcla.
  • Even some of the natural stuff.
  • So I don't know, do you like it?
  • Let me know below, if you're super into Spanish
  • torrefacto coffee.
  • It might be three of you.
  • The word donut actually does exist in Spanish
  • but it refers to the specific brand Donuts.
  • If you say, "I'm gonna have a Donut,"
  • that's what you're gonna have, this brand
  • and it's a donut.
  • But if you're saying pleural, people say "donus."
  • They don't say the T, it's like quiero dos donus.
  • T gets skipped, why does the T get skipped out?
  • Too hard? - Too hard.
  • T's too hard.
  • When I moved originally to France before I lived in Spain,
  • they had these for breakfast.
  • These little tiny toast things.
  • That are like little hard breads.
  • Sort of really weird because it's like
  • you rather have toast or you have bread.
  • But this is sort of pre-toasted crunchy things.
  • So something a lot of people eat for breakfast
  • are Magdalenas, which are really like simple cupcakes.
  • And I actually got really into them when I first moved here
  • and put on a lot of weight so full of crap.
  • So be careful.
  • Another obsession of mine when I first moved here
  • was pan de leche or milk bread.
  • These little soft pillowy, cloud-like sweet bread things.
  • I was obsessed and it contributed to my weight gain
  • and I loved the Bimbo bread, Bimbo.
  • A word that's a little different in English.
  • So a candy that's quite big here, but essentially racist
  • are Conguitos, little chocolate candies,
  • which obviously conguito means
  • what little people from the Conga?
  • Yeah, little people from the Conga,
  • so maybe that's from the dictatorship, I'm not sure.
  • But a little out of time I think on that one.
  • Might need to tweak that.
  • So for all my kiwi friends out there the milo of Spain
  • is ColaCao, this chocolate drink.
  • Warm chocolate drink that kids drink it,
  • adults drink it, everybody drinks ColaCao.
  • A lot of people still drink ColaCao even
  • into their mature years.
  • I heard someone order one in a bar the other day
  • with extra frothy milk.
  • See in the International section here Marmite.
  • I got Yoly into Marmite after a few years
  • and now she loves it.
  • - So we're taking one home.
  • - So we're taking some Marmite home,
  • 'cause we're almost out.
  • This is the English Marmite, not the Kiwi Marmite
  • we're almost out of Kiwi Marmite.
  • so if you've never tried Marmite you will hate it
  • for the first five years when you try it.
  • But then one day, all you will want that morning
  • for breakfast is Marmite.
  • Trust me, you gotta work through those five years though.
  • We're in the aperitivos section, nuts potato chips,
  • and olives.
  • Potato chip flavors are a precise reflection
  • of what people eat when they're not eating potato chips.
  • And so one of my favorite guilty pleasures
  • is jamon flavored potato chips.
  • These, man, once you start you will never stop.
  • (Yoly laughs)
  • When I grew up it was chicken-flavored chips
  • in New Zealand and here sabor a jamon
  • it's such a guilty flavor.
  • Ruffless how we say Ruffles here,
  • ham flavored, out of control.
  • Try them if you come.
  • Do you have ham-flavored Pringles back home, here we do.
  • Ham-flavored Pringles.
  • Never really been a big fan of Pringles.
  • They always taste like,
  • they're like dehydrated potato or something.
  • They always taste a bit funny.
  • But ham flavored, even in the Pringles.
  • A very Spanish combination of flavors is garlic and parsley.
  • One of my favorite dishes Gambas Al Ajillo,
  • prawns with garlic and parsley is delicious.
  • And here we have potato chips with garlic and parsley.
  • So it's true, potato chip flavors really just show you
  • what people are eating when they're not eating potato chips.
  • I know that's a bit confusing, but I think,
  • I think there's something in that.
  • Ham, garlic and parsley.
  • This is a country where we eat a lot of fried eggs.
  • And we have fried egg flavored potato chips.
  • I've never seen these before.
  • Fried egg potato chips, we're buying these.
  • We're taking these back, I wanna try this.
  • So we've found Yoly's favorite snack
  • when she was growing up.
  • - Pelotazos, so delicious, so it's actually
  • kind of the greasiest snack in the market.
  • So you can just get one of these, it's pelotas,
  • bowls like pupa bowls.
  • You just get one of those on the floor and then step on it.
  • And then when you draw the paste there's like this stain
  • of like grease on the floor.
  • - Wow, let's get a pack.
  • - They're amazing. - They sound great.
  • - Yummy.
  • - Sometimes when you're in a tapas bar,
  • you'll get given pork rinds, pork tiritas as a tapa,
  • and then they are dangerous.
  • You have about three of those and you're gonna
  • have a stomachache I always find.
  • I love these ones, they have like this little
  • ham with like (speaks foreign language) with pork rind
  • coming out of it.
  • I'm curious, sort of odd, little bit scary.
  • And then for those rich people out there,
  • you have Iberian potato chips.
  • Not just normal ham potato chips Iberian ham potato chips.
  • Huge canned olive section behind me,
  • but a little tip is that if the supermarket
  • you're going to has a fresh olive section
  • that's where you want to go.
  • And we're gonna go to there after this.
  • I wouldn't buy the canned stuff.
  • They're fine, but fresh is kinda tastier.
  • A classic Spanish snack.
  • The most classic Spanish snack and a real challenge
  • for me are pipas, sunflower seeds.
  • And you buy them, they're covered in salt.
  • I know you eat these in the states for example
  • at baseball games and you open them with your teeth
  • and suck out the pit with your, the seed with your tongue.
  • For idiots like me who still can't figure it out,
  • you have peeled ones peladas.
  • - [Yoly] Peladas. - Say peeled.
  • And so you're just gonna eat them directly.
  • But saying that I would eat those they're like training
  • wheel pepas, because I can't get it, can't figure it out.
  • Feel like I'm always gonna
  • split my teeth in two or something.
  • And you see people who've been eating them,
  • there's just a pile of shells all around them.
  • Okay, my personal challenge to you is can you handle
  • white asparagus, these guys?
  • They're super scary and I hope my mother-in-law
  • is not watching because she serves them at Christmas.
  • And it's like I have to...
  • - [Yoly] Every weekend almost.
  • - Every weekend, look at this guy, wow.
  • I have to like, I choke my way through them.
  • I mean, I eat pretty much anything, and I eat them,
  • but white asparagus, still not there yet, still not there.
  • - [Yoly] With mayonnaise.
  • - With mayonnaise always so gluggy, so gross.
  • This is an entire section dedicated to white asparagus.
  • The bane of my gastronomic existence in Spain.
  • They're not cheap either.
  • If you love these and a lot of people do,
  • they're a delicacy.
  • This one here, you get 10 to 14 white asparagus
  • in this can 11 euros, 11 euros.
  • Remember, you can buy an entire ham for 30 euros.
  • So man yeah you can spend a lot of money on white asparagus,
  • if you're really into it, white gold.
  • Do you like white asparagus?
  • - Uh, is my mom watching?
  • (James and Yoly laughing)
  • Yoly's Spanish and not even she's not convinced
  • on the white asparagus thing.
  • - Yeah.
  • - We need to figure this out.
  • Do you love white asparagus?
  • Love it or hate it, let me know below.
  • It's always interesting in a supermarket
  • and you have traditional dishes
  • but they're in a pre-packaged form.
  • Things that you would never have in another country.
  • So here we have Madrid stew Cocido Madrileno
  • which is the classic meat, vegetable, and chickpea stew
  • that you have in the Winter
  • and it's really delicious in a can.
  • Cocido Madrileno in a can.
  • We also have up here Callos a la Madrilena in a can.
  • So that is tripe stew, Madrid tripe stew.
  • So, I mean, you wouldn't necessarily even get these
  • maybe in other parts of Spain.
  • I don't know, maybe in a little bit.
  • But these are regional, pre-packaged (mumbles).
  • One of the delicacies in this country
  • is canned seafood.
  • Now the idea might freak you out a little bit.
  • I mean, we have wonderful fresh seafood,
  • but you also have amazing canned seafood
  • and a huge tradition often.
  • Often shellfish for instance can actually be more
  • expensive in the can than it was fresh.
  • Because the idea is that if it's canned well
  • it's a wonderful way to preserve seafood
  • and actually improves the flavor.
  • I read about famous Michelin star Spanish chefs
  • who one of their favorite food memories
  • is to get a great can of canned, can of canned
  • cockles, open 'em up, a little lemon on it,
  • and just sit there and eat them and I totally understand.
  • So you have to try it when you come to visit.
  • We have canned calamari in American sauce,
  • salsa Americana, it's like a tomato sauce I believe.
  • Canned squid, in it's black ink from Galicia
  • from the North.
  • Squid again in it's own ink.
  • Do you think the Velazquez family gets commission
  • on these canned calamari in American sauce?
  • Canned razor clams, canned scallops,
  • canned fake baby shrimp, fake baby eels, sorry.
  • And clams, canned cod liver, very specific.
  • Canned mayulas, I don't even know what mayulas are.
  • I've never seen them before.
  • Love the picture, look at that king.
  • Canned cockles and poton.
  • Poton is like weird bottom-crawling
  • - [Yoly] Octopus.
  • octopussy sort of calamari type thing.
  • Very vague and I'm sorry about that, we'll look it up.
  • And stuffed squid in it's own ink, I think.
  • So you can see there's an enormous section here
  • dedicated to canned mussels.
  • These are all canned mussels.
  • So many brands.
  • I can never get over how many brands there are.
  • One little thing that I actually really love about
  • the canned seafood in this country is the packaging.
  • There are so many brands of canned seafood
  • and a large proportion of the packaging
  • looks like it hasn't been updated
  • since like the 1950's or 1960's.
  • I love that font, it's such an old school font.
  • And, of course, we're in the land of olive oil.
  • Spain makes almost half the world's olive oil
  • and the average Spaniard eats or drinks eats 2-1/2 gallons
  • which is 10 liters of olive oil a year.
  • And you can see the huge array here
  • from little boutique brands to more industrial brands.
  • Everything from normal to virgin to extra virgin.
  • Let's check some of the prices out.
  • Because even extra virgin is really cheap here.
  • And that's why if you're in Spain,
  • you gotta eat the extra virgin.
  • Got extra virgin, it's the supermarket's brand,
  • and it's three euros 59 for a liter.
  • Let me know actually, I'm really interested
  • in the comments.
  • How does that compare to the price of olive oil
  • in your country?
  • So the cheapest I can see 359 for a liter.
  • And an important thing to remember is when it doesn't
  • say virgin or extra virgin, if it just says 0.4 or 0,4
  • that is just normal olive oil.
  • And actually that is what I'm gonna call technically
  • in a sense lampante oil, because historically
  • it was used for lamp oil.
  • So of course those were a little bit
  • more industrial olive oils.
  • You can spend more.
  • You know, we do have boutique or really high grade olive oil
  • in this country.
  • This one, for example, is 500 mL and that's 8 euro 60.
  • So a lot more expensive.
  • That's organic.
  • One thing to keep in mind, extra virgin olive oil
  • in Spain is actually a technical term.
  • It means it's passed a smell test, a taste test
  • and a chemical test.
  • So you can be guaranteed that it's high quality,
  • if it says extra virgin.
  • We had Velazquez on the canned calamari in it's own ink
  • and now we have Goya on the olive oil.
  • That's not Goya obviously, that's the Duchess of Alba,
  • but Goya painted it.
  • Here's something you wouldn't see in an English speaking
  • country is washing powder or washing liquid called colon.
  • If you like sparkling water Vichy Catalan
  • is actually quite a yummy one.
  • It's a little bit salty, but it always makes me think
  • of Vichy of occupied France and the Vichy collaborators.
  • The beer from Madrid is called Mahou.
  • And if you're hardcore and you're having a party,
  • this is what you want to buy.
  • They're called litronas.
  • And that is a liter as the name suggests of beer.
  • And so litronas, that's how you buy it,
  • when people are coming over, big thing.
  • Well that's how we buy it anyway.
  • And so behind me all this beer along here is alcohol free.
  • And Spain is one of the leaders in alcohol-free beer.
  • And it's really interesting,
  • because this is a beer drinking country,
  • more than it is in the way of wine drinking country.
  • So many people drink beer and so if you can't drink
  • beer for whatever reason, for health reasons
  • or you're pregnant, whatever it is,
  • there's a huge industry of zero alcohol beer.
  • And you'll see it, it'll be zero, zero.
  • And that's how you know.
  • Every brand has one, all the bars have zero alcohol beer.
  • I've even seen TV commercials for zero alcohol beer.
  • And there's an image of a pregnant woman
  • like with her belly with a baby in it
  • drinking a zero alcohol beer.
  • So it's super accepted and you'll see it everywhere.
  • I find it tastes weird.
  • Something happens when you take the alcohol out
  • that something goes wrong, call me crazy.
  • One thing when I first moved to Spain eight years ago,
  • craft beer was just not a thing.
  • And now it's really pretty big.
  • Again, because this is a big beer drinking country.
  • And you'll find this is one of the earlier ones
  • here that came in Madrid La Viegen and they have
  • a jamonera beer, jamonera.
  • I think they said once it goes well with a ham sandwich.
  • (speaks foreign language)
  • So now you see a huge range of local beers Madrid beers.
  • The movement started really in Catalonia
  • and of course the big industrial brands are now making
  • their own artisanal beers.
  • So huge huge beer industry.
  • Madrid beer brand is Cibele, it's named after the
  • goddess in the fountain statue in the center of the city.
  • And here we have the brown-haired girl
  • and the blond-haired girl, Merena and Rubia.
  • (speaks foreign language)
  • So you'll see a huge gin selection always in Spain
  • because we're massive gin drinkers here.
  • You'll see in bars people drink
  • big ballon-sized glasses of gin.
  • They drink after the meal, not before, not as a cocktail.
  • Because we'll have something like vermouth or sherry
  • or something else beforehand.
  • So huge gin selection behind me.
  • And the gin and tonics yeah.
  • I mean it's a craze, it's dying down a little bit.
  • But they're large and often the bartender
  • just keeps pouring and he'll stop
  • when you tell him to stop.
  • For the Vermouth lovers out there,
  • we have pretty decent selection, pretty serious.
  • And if you're a really serious Vermouth drinker
  • you can get a box of it.
  • I can't even lift it, let alone drink it.
  • But that's if you're serious aperitivo freak.
  • Look at this guy 1.5 liters of Vermouth.
  • That's white Vermouth, 1.5 liters.
  • By the way little tip, if you're in Spain,
  • don't drink Martini, it's I call it
  • the Coca Cola of Vermouths.
  • You want to get the local stuff,
  • not the international brand.
  • So this is still wine country.
  • We do drink a lot of beer, but we make a lot of wine,
  • even though we don't drink as much as we used to.
  • So time for a little game, I'm gonna try and find
  • the cheapest wine here in the supermarket
  • and the most expensive see how we go.
  • 'Cause wine can be pretty cheap in this country.
  • To be clear on the rules, I'm gonna rule out
  • boxed Tetra Brik wine.
  • This wine is a liter for 90 cents.
  • I feel like we need to stick to the, stick to the glass.
  • Okay, so we have found the cheapest wine here.
  • It's called Elegido, which means the chosen one.
  • And it's a (speaks foreign language) it's 196
  • for a liter, it says superior
  • Calidad superior, high quality, who am I to judge?
  • And it says here on the back it's from Spain
  • it's (speaks foreign language) and it goes well
  • with tapas as if that's a food group, red meats
  • and cheeses.
  • So I mean it sounds great.
  • Also goes well with a great hangover the next day, no doubt.
  • There's another one that's actually a bit cheaper
  • but it's sold out.
  • So if it's in demand, must be even better
  • than the (speaks foreign language).
  • We found the most expensive wine, 259 euros
  • for a (speaks foreign language) which is a wine from
  • (speaks foreign language)
  • a region a few hours North from here, a hot region.
  • It's a 2005 and it's one of Spain's most famous wines.
  • So a lot of supermarkets wouldn't have a wine that good.
  • Actually supermarket wine selections
  • are often pretty lacking in this country.
  • But this is a really big supermarket so it does.
  • So often you'll find the most expensive wine
  • will be around maybe 15 euros max
  • and everything downhill to 165 or whatever
  • that other one was.
  • But my little tip if you wanna drink great wine
  • when you're in Spain, I would stick away
  • from anything under like six euros.
  • The minute you hit like nine, 10, up to 12 euros,
  • you're gonna drink some really good wine.
  • And you know the cheap stuff it's fine,
  • but it still can taste pretty cheap.
  • So I would say six, seven euros and upwards.
  • But, I don't know, what do you guys drink,
  • let me know.
  • Let me know what you drink when you're in Spain.
  • And maybe I'm completely wrong and I'm a wine snob
  • and you're like shut the hell up.
  • So we'll see.
  • A little anecdote here if you're not drinking wine
  • (mumbles) you want a non-alcoholic drink,
  • you drink Mosto, Mosto is effectively grape juice.
  • But one thing I love about this brand Greip
  • it's what' Yoly's parents sometimes drink,
  • is that it's spelled G-R-E-I-P because then if you don't
  • speak English and you're Spanish and you pronounce it
  • Greip it sounds like you're saying grape
  • but with your Spanish accent.
  • If you spell it like we spell it G-R-A-P-E
  • people would say grappe.
  • So my mother-in-law says (speaks foreign language),
  • I feel like grape.
  • And it's been spelled perfectly for
  • that so kinda genius really right?
  • Of course, you know how much we love gazpacho,
  • that cold tomato soup.
  • In this country, we have like a whole mini section here.
  • Different gazpachos that, I mean they're all pretty similar,
  • I guess, but different brands.
  • We've got a gourmet one down here with almond in it.
  • We've also got here san morejo
  • which is the slightly thicker style of tomato puree soup.
  • You don't drink it as much, but you eat it with a spoon.
  • So serious gazpacho section here.
  • So while we're in the cold soup section san morejo
  • and gazpacho also when you're in Spain
  • and it's Summer, see if you can get Ajoblano,
  • which means white garlic, but it's actually made
  • from ground-up almonds.
  • And it's this beautiful white almond cold soup
  • with garlic in there often served with grapes.
  • My god, in Summer it's so refreshing.
  • In case you missed the cured meats in the other spot
  • we've got a whole aisle of cured meats here again
  • of sausage and chorizo and salchichon
  • just in case, of course.
  • York, Y-O-R-K like the city in England.
  • That is the name we have for what we call English style ham
  • which is boiled ham.
  • This is not the best looking version of it.
  • It comes better, but jamon York is exactly that.
  • It's boiled classic ham, like the ham you might see
  • in New Zealand for example.
  • And what the hell is this, chopped?
  • It's literally just called chopped or chopp-ed
  • if you're speaking Spanish.
  • So that is a word that's come into the Spanish language
  • obviously from English and we call it chopp-ed
  • and it just means really cheap cuts of processed ham.
  • So keep away from the chopp-ed, stick to the
  • jamon Iberico de Bellota, please.
  • More tapas, in this case, mushrooms and garlic.
  • And, yeah, okay, a little close to the dry bread
  • or crackers, you know, you can do better than this
  • than the frozen version, even though it says gourmet.
  • So I'd make it at home with fresh mushroom and garlic.
  • But patatas bravisimas frozen, patatas bravisimas.
  • So okay closer to tapas than some of the other things
  • we've seen but you can get better patatas bravisimas
  • in a bar than probably these frozen ones.
  • Okay, so it's getting real here in the supermarket,
  • almost political because we're in the Sabores
  • del mundo, flavors of the world, and we have churros.
  • Churros rellenos.
  • Now why would churros be in the international section
  • in a Spanish supermarket?
  • But that's because these are stuffed or filled churros
  • filled with chocolate.
  • We don't stuff churros in this country with chocolate.
  • A barbarity that's been brought in.
  • We just have 'em plain and dip 'em in chocolate.
  • And the other thing fideua.
  • Now this is a Catalan dish.
  • It's kinda like paella, but it uses little noodles
  • instead of rice.
  • So they've got a Catalan dish in the flavors of the world
  • section so I don't know if it's a political statement
  • or just sheer recklessness,
  • but that could cause an incident.
  • Frozen paella, yes we also eat frozen,
  • well we don't eat frozen paella, but in Spain
  • they have frozen paella in Spain.
  • Avoid, this one says you can cook it in five minutes.
  • No good paella was ever made in five minutes.
  • How long should it take, like an hour?
  • - [Yoly] Ah, yeah.
  • - Yeah, 45 minutes, an hour.
  • Now this is a country that knows how to do the aperitivo.
  • Look at this section of the supermarket behind me
  • of all these olives and pickled skewers of things
  • and even they actually fry, cut and fry
  • their own potato chips here.
  • Because it's such a huge tradition of potato chips
  • in this country and homemade potato chips.
  • And pickled eggplant, olives, just so much going on.
  • And so I fell in love with the aperitivo tradition
  • in this country and you can see why.
  • Look at this, amazing, best way to start,
  • I was gonna say start the day,
  • but no before lunch, before lunch.
  • You don't start the day with the aperitivo
  • that would mean you're an alcoholic.
  • Guys we made it out alive, stealth mission complete.
  • I've got my little carrito here.
  • Thumbs up if you enjoyed that little exploration
  • of a Spanish supermarket.
  • Subscribe if you wanna explore more of Spain with me
  • and well thanks for watching
  • and we'll see you in the next video, Ciao!

Download subtitle

Description

What's it like in a Spanish supermarket? It's time to find out! Yoly and I hit one of Madrid's largest supermarkets to explore what we buy and eat in this country. Spanish snacks, jamón, cheese, seafood, drinks, wine, beer, frozen food and even pigs brains! It's all here!

1. WELCOME TO SPAIN REVEALED!
⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯
▶ Subscribe to see my latest videos! http://bit.ly/SubscribeJamesBlick

▶ Get my FREE GUIDE to my favourite tapas bars in Madrid, Barcelona, Seville & San Sebastian http://bit.ly/2REk5KV

2. EXPLORE SPAIN LIKE A LOCAL!
⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯
▶ Join a delicious food tour with my company Devour Tours http://bit.ly/2zsS2Wb

▶ Check out my favourite books about Spain http://amzn.to/2ng6ihk.

▶ Learn Spanish with this FREE trial from Rocket Languages http://bit.ly/2MM7btx

▶ I book my accommodation with Booking.com - it’s super fast and easy. Check it out here: https://booki.ng/2N4tVsh.

▶ Say hi on Instagram! http://bit.ly/2LBx9OG

3. EXPLORING A MASSIVE SPANISH SUPERMARKET!
⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯
I always think it's really interesting visiting supermarkets in new countries. It gives you a real insight into the local diet, and the local culture. So Yoly and I decided to dive into the massive supermarket in the outskirts of Madrid to give you guys an insight into what's there. We check out Spanish potato chips, the massive selection of jamón, lots of interesting meats (blood sausage, rabbit, pigs brains and snout and more), cheeses, more cured meats and so much more.

But beyond that, we also dove into the frozen food section to see what we could find (yes, we found frozen paella in Spain!). And we also explored the enormous olive oil section, with everything from normal olive oil, right through to extra virgin olive oil (which is pretty cheap in Spain!).

WHO IS JAMES BLICK?
⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯⋯
Hola! I’m James Blick. Spain is my passion! Its food, its culture, its history and its people. And I get a massive kick out of sharing everything I’ve learned with visitors to this country. My mission? To help you have a true, rich and delicious experience in Spain! If that sounds like something you’re into, then I’d love you to subscribe and join this community of Spain Lovers! http://bit.ly/SubscribeJamesBlick

*Some of the links above may be affiliate links. This means that by buying a product via the link you are supporting my ability to keep creating videos. You don't pay any more money for the product, but I earn a small percentage that I use to make more videos. Thanks for your support!

Trending videos