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Binging with Babish: A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving

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11:20   |   Nov 20, 2018

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Binging with Babish: A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving
Binging with Babish: A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving thumb Binging with Babish: A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving thumb Binging with Babish: A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving thumb

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  • [music]
  • Hey, what's up guys, welcome back to Binging with Babish, where this week
  • we are taking a look at Snoopy's Thanksgiving dinner.
  • Which I don't think is that bad, as long as you eat around the black licorice jelly beans.
  • I'm kind of a pink man myself. Just kidding.
  • Of course, we are making pumpkin pie and Snoopy's whole roast turkey.
  • If your whole fresh turkey has one of those "pop out when it's done" things, take that out.
  • We don't need that where we're goin'.
  • And our first of many steps is to loosen the skin from the body of the turkey
  • which we're gonna do by shoving our begloved digits between the meat and the skin until it resembles the skin around your elbows
  • Eurgh. Sorry that's gross, it's just the most accurate comparison I've got.
  • Next up, we're combining about a quarter cup of kosher salt with maybe a tablespoon of freshly ground black pepper -
  • we are seasoning the cavity and the meat underneath the skin.
  • Then once all the meat is nice and seasoned, and we've used up about three-quarters of the mixture
  • we're going to add about a teaspoon and a half of baking powder to make a seasoning for the skin itself.
  • This is going to lower the temperature at which the Maillard reaction occurs and give us a more brown skin.
  • So once we've got every inch of this bird deeply seasoned in baking powder,
  • we're going to let it rest uncovered in the fridge for 24 hours.
  • Which I dare say is plenty of time to get to work on our pumpkin pie.
  • For this, we are going to need one sugar pie pumpkin
  • (I'm using two because I need extra puree because I'm making pumpkin pie for my family Thanksgiving)
  • But if you're just making one pie,
  • you just need one pumpkin, sliced in half and removed of its seeds and guts.
  • Then we're placing these cut side down on a parchment lined baking sheet and roasting at
  • 325 degrees Fahrenheit for one hour. Which I dare say is plenty of time to make our pie crust.
  • Into the bowl of a food processor goes six and one quarter ounces of all-purpose flour,
  • 10 tablespoons of very cold, chilled unsalted butter that we're gonna pulse together until it resembles
  • something between tiny pebbles and wet sand. We want little tiny chunks of butter
  • that can be just barely distinguished by the human eye.
  • We're then pouring this mixture into a medium bowl, adding the 1/2 teaspoon of salt and
  • 1 tablespoon of sugar that we should have added in the food processor,
  • mixing those together and then sprinkling some ice water over top.
  • I'm starting with three and a half tablespoons - that gives me about a half a tablespoon of leeway if the dough is too dry.
  • We're gently folding that together, trying to mix as little as possible, turning out on to our work surface -
  • we're just trying to make sure that all of the flour is hydrated.
  • Once it forms a cohesive mass, we are wrapping it in plastic wrap and refrigerating for at least 30 minutes.
  • Which I daresay is plenty of time to make our pie filling.
  • I'm sorry, I promise that's last time I'll say that.
  • Our pumpkins are out of the oven, and we know that they're done because a paring knife can pass through them without resistance.
  • So we want to peel the skins off these pumpkins and allow them to let off a little steam,
  • Like a co-worker at an open bar Christmas party, but while it's still warm
  • I want to put about two cups into the bowl of a food processor.
  • This is going to help it combine more easily with one cup of packed brown sugar and
  • optionally a tablespoon or two of maple syrup.
  • We are processing that together for 60 to 90 seconds until very smooth. And then we're going to start adding some spices.
  • I'm going with two teaspoons of cinnamon, two teaspoons of ground ginger, a quarter teaspoon
  • each of allspice and ground cloves, and a generous grating of freshly grated nutmeg.
  • This is the one that makes all the difference, trust me.
  • Plus we're adding a half a cup of milk and three quarters of a cup of heavy cream.
  • And now that we've got some nice cold stuff in there, we can add our eggs without cooking them - four eggs in total, and then we are processing everyone together
  • for an additional minute until smooth and creamy. Then get that out of the way because it's time to lightly flour our work
  • surface, hands, and rolling pin, and prepare our freshly refrigerated dough for its enwidening.
  • Yes, I know that is very far from an actual word.
  • Regardless, we are rolling this guy out to about two inches wider than our pie pan
  • and we're going to use our rolling pin to roll the dough up and then
  • unfurl into said awaiting pie pan. And you might notice that mine looks pretty bad
  • And at this point you need to make a decision. What's more important to you?
  • Light, flaky, crispy layers or perfectly (???) pastry?
  • If your answer is the former then patch it up as best you can and refrigerate for 15 minutes. Trust me,
  • it's gonna end up looking just fine. Poke a whole bunch of holes in the bottom with a fork, press down a layer of aluminum foil
  • into the bottom of the pie crust and fill with your desired pie weights.
  • I'm going with brown rice and we are par baking this crust for 15 minutes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit on a preheated pizza stone.
  • This is going to help accelerate the browning and prevent soggy bottoms. Then into our hot pie shell goes the pie filling.
  • We're giving the whole thing a little tappy tap to get rid of any stubborn bubbles and baking for about 25 minutes until the crust
  • is brown and the filling is set, but jiggly. Just a little jiggle like that.
  • Then we are refrigerating overnight. Now if you'll excuse me, I'm gonna go get some sleep.
  • [music interlude]
  • You can tell it's the next day because my shirt is ever so slightly different.
  • And we are cutting up some bread for our stuffing.
  • Because today is turkey day.
  • And into a 225 degree Fahrenheit oven goes
  • about three-quarters of a loaf of white
  • sandwich bread cut to one half inch pieces
  • tossed occasionally and baked for one hour until completely dry.
  • Then here we have the base elements of stuffing
  • And don't worry, I'll go over this on the stove top.
  • Into a high-walled sauté pan goes about 3 tablespoons of unsalted butter
  • that we're gonna get all nice and melty and foamy
  • before adding 1 medium finely chopped Spanish onion.
  • We're just gonna sauté this for a few minutes or until soft and translucent.
  • Then we're going to add 2 ribs of finely chopped celery very slowly for dramatic effect, I guess.
  • Sauté for an additional minute just to introduce some heat to the celery
  • and then we're gonna start adding some chopped herbs,
  • 1 tablespoon of freshly chopped sage,
  • and 1 teaspoon each chopped thyme and rosemary
  • all of which we're gonna sauté for another 2-3 minutes to let those flavours, I don't know, get to know each other.
  • Then we've got our cooled off bread cubes in a large bowl, to which we're going to add about a tablespoon of finely chopped parsley, and our onion, celery, herb mixure.
  • Along with about 2/3 of a cup of fresh turkey stock. If you want to see how to make turkey stock, go check out the moist maker sandwich video
  • In the upper right-hand corner, right now.
  • We're tossing everything together, seasoning with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.
  • And we want to reach this consistency
  • where everything is sticking together
  • but there are still individual cubes of bread.
  • That's looking perfect so here comes our air chilled turkey
  • The inside of which we're going to line with a couple layers of cheese cloth
  • I know that sounds weird but this is gonna make it really
  • easy to get all the stuffing out of the bird
  • which we're going to want to do because
  • by the time the stuffing is properly cooked the bird will be overcooked
  • So we're shoving as much stuffing as will fit
  • in our bird's...
  • ass. I don't know what you call it
  • Cavity? They both sound gross
  • Tying the cheese cloth shut behind it and then tying
  • the legs over top using a piece of butcher's twine,
  • then it's time to set this guy up on a roasting rack
  • but what if you don't have one?
  • Not to worry!
  • Like most problems in life,
  • this can be solved with aluminium foil.
  • We're just going to roll up some cylinders of aluminium foil and line the bottom of the pan
  • just enough to elevate the turkey off the bottom of the pan.
  • We are placing this breast-side down for the first half of cooking,
  • and lining the bottom with bacon.
  • I'm gonna add a sort of cross-strut here for additional turkey support,
  • and into a preheated 325 degree Fahrenheit oven she goes,
  • for two to two and a half hours
  • until the thickest part of the breast registers 160 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Just enough time to prepare for phase two of cooking,
  • which involves the deployment of root vegetables,
  • which it looks like Snoopy used to serve the turkey on.
  • So we're placing these turnips, parsnips, carrots, and pearl red onions
  • into a bowl, seasoning with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper,
  • giving them a drizzle of vegetable oil, and seeing if we can toss them
  • in a bowl that's too small for the job.
  • Here we go, one -
  • uh, we lost a couple, alright -
  • One! Two!
  • Okay, we lost a carrot, no biggie.
  • Eventually, you'll get these evenly coated,
  • and the turkey will emerge from its slumber once it's reached 130 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • And look at that, bacon curved into a perfect smile for your congee breakfast bowl from Mulan.
  • Once we have removed our bacon blanket,
  • it's time to make a new bed for our beast.
  • Into a rimmed baking sheet go our root vegetables, topped with a wire rack,
  • and on top of that goes our turkey, this time, breast side up,
  • because it's time to both quickly roast our vegetables
  • and brown this sucker. First, we have to remove
  • our stuffing from this situation, so cut open the legs,
  • and really disgustingly retrieve our poultry parcel,
  • which we're going to set aside because now it's time
  • to give our bird a butter bath. In clarified butter, to be precise.
  • Clarified butter doesn't burn at the same temperature as regular butter,
  • it's easy to make, and it's going to give us a really deeply brown skin.
  • So once you've brushed every square inch of this guy,
  • it's going into an increased, 425 degree Fahrenheit oven for about 45 minutes,
  • during which time we can finish preparing our stuffing.
  • We're going to combine the cavity stuffing, ew,
  • which we're going to combine with the rest of the refrigerated stuffing,
  • which should cool it down enough to add one egg, beaten, into a quarter-cup of turkey stock.
  • This is just gonna help bind everything together,
  • and get everybody to the right final consistency.
  • We're just giving that a cursory mix before dumping into a generously buttered casserole,
  • in which we're going to spread the stuffing evenly, cover, and set aside,
  • until the turkey comes out the oven.
  • Here's the time where you can finalize any cranberry sauce or gravies,
  • because once that turkey hits 160 degrees Fahrenheit in the thickest part of the breast,
  • it is time to take it out and admire its shatteringly crisp skin.
  • We're taking our turkey, Tom, off the rack,
  • so we can retrieve any accumulated juices in the pan,
  • for gravy enhancement.
  • We are then letting our turkey rest for 30 minutes,
  • at room temperature, uncovered.
  • I know I've said to cover turkeys in the past with aluminium foil,
  • do not do it, or you're going to ruin this beautifully crisp skin.
  • We're then giving our vegetables a little toss,
  • and returning them to the oven along with the stuffing for about 20 minutes,
  • until both are fully cooked.
  • Last up, I need to make whipped cream for the pumpkin pie,
  • I can't find my hand mixer, so I'm left with only one choice,
  • which is to mix by hand.
  • Today was bi-'s and tri-'s day at the gym,
  • so, needless to say, this was a challenge.
  • I can really only recommend it in the most desperate of circumstances, like these.
  • Once you've got some nice stiff peaks going, it's time to plate up.
  • After a short break, of course.
  • Oh, my God, I have never felt more my age.
  • A little taste to make sure we've added enough sugar,
  • you can add vanilla if you'd like,
  • and then onto a large serving platter go our roasted root vegetables,
  • on top of which, just for that sort of Norman Rockwell effect,
  • we're going to place our whole turkey.
  • I can't really recommend this, it's way more difficult to carve,
  • but I get it, it's traditional,
  • and we're serving that up with our gravy,
  • stuffing, cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie.
  • I know Snoopy didn't serve all this stuff,
  • but what the hell is turkey without gravy?
  • We're topping our pie with a healthy layer of whipped cream,
  • and there you have it.
  • I gotta say, it looks a hell of a lot better than jellybeans, toast, and pretzel sticks.
  • And while a whole turkey certainly looks good,
  • it's very hard to carve at the table,
  • so I would enthusiastically recommend carving it beforehand.
  • First we've gotta take off the drumsticks, and then we've gotta remove the wishbone.
  • Not only because it's going to make it easier to remove the breasts,
  • but because we get to make a wish.
  • Whoever gets the longer side gets to -
  • oh. If it breaks in the middle, what happens?
  • Some kind of wish stalemate.
  • Anyway, we are cutting down the side of the breastbone,
  • and then cutting underneath the breast to remove it for easy slicing.
  • Try to keep the skin as intact as possible,
  • it's going to make for a better presentation,
  • slice to your desired specifications, plate up,
  • and then dark meat is where it gets kind of tricky.
  • I kinda like to just remove the whole thigh and shred the meat.
  • And there you have it. Way easier to carve up beforehand,
  • and I think that makes just as handsome a presentation.
  • And legally, after having turkey, you have to have some pumpkin pie.
  • If you are allergic to or afraid of pumpkins,
  • apple is an acceptable substitute.
  • Now I've gotta say, this is the best pumpkin pie I've ever had.
  • It's light and smooth and creamy,
  • but that being said, I've gotta save room, I mean,
  • it's not even actually Thanksgiving yet.
  • Hey guys, I just wanna wish you a happy Thanksgiving,
  • and share the all new Binging with Babish Spanish channel with you.
  • The link is in this video's description,
  • it's a place where you and your Spanish-speaking friends
  • can enjoy over-dubbed episodes of Binging with Babish every Wednesday.
  • The Moistmaker episode goes live tomorrow,
  • check it out, have some turkey,
  • have fun with your friends and family,
  • and cook something for someone you care about.

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Check out the new Spanish-language BwB channel here!
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFIrATufCdnXup2PmK3STTg

Check out my playlist of preferred cooking tunes, Bangers with Babish: https://open.spotify.com/user/easybakeandy/playlist/04Gp926I7HFqBLVDI2eRJI

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