LOADING ...

5 Tips How To Grow a Ton of Passionfruit From ONE Passion Fruit!

161K+ views   |   6K+ likes   |   75 dislikes   |  
Jul 27, 2019

Thumbs

5 Tips How To Grow a Ton of Passionfruit From ONE Passion Fruit!
5 Tips How To Grow a Ton of Passionfruit From ONE Passion Fruit! thumb 5 Tips How To Grow a Ton of Passionfruit From ONE Passion Fruit! thumb 5 Tips How To Grow a Ton of Passionfruit From ONE Passion Fruit! thumb

Transcription

  • Do you know how expensive passion fruit can be?
  • It's outrageous to pay so much money for something that grows so easily.
  • G'day! I'm Mark from Self Sufficient Me and in this video
  • I'm going to give you my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of passion fruit.
  • Let's get into it!
  • Whew!
  • Did you hear that?
  • That was a passion fruit dropping, they're bloody heavy.
  • Wouldn't want that to hit you on the noggin.
  • We had friends over for a barbie the other day and we took them for a walk around the garden
  • and come across the passion fruits and one of them said 'Ugh, passion fruits. They grow like a weed!'
  • And we all laughed - it's true!
  • Another true story was the fact that passion fruit was the first major food crop we grew
  • when we moved here 13 years ago in 2006.
  • Yeah I know, another piece of trivia you don't care much about.
  • Did you also know that purple passion fruit is the most popular?
  • And considered the best tasting variety?
  • But I don't agree with that assessment at all.
  • We're growing a green-yellow variety that just grew wild on our property
  • so we decided to propagate it
  • and it has an excellent taste. In fact, we prefer it to the purple ones.
  • Also I know several people who prefer the oblong banana passion fruit to the purple variety
  • so I guess it's personal preference combined with the evolved variety
  • and where it's grown, that influences how good different types are.
  • Speaking of where it's grown, passion fruit vines are typically a subtropical to tropical plant
  • originally from South America, so if you want to grow it in a colder climate you can
  • but I recommend you grow them in a hot house or greenhouse to give it that extra warm
  • or it likely will die through winter, or not fruit at all.
  • In temperate climates it's still fine, below subtropical
  • but in places where it gets really cold, yeah you're going to have trouble growing these.
  • Apparently the purple varieties withstand cooler temps
  • and this is likely true, and certainly what I've experienced with purple vines growing better through our winters
  • whereas the yellow dies back in mid winter.
  • Tip Number One: True to type.
  • Ugh. I was going to keep eating passion fruit throughout the video as a prop
  • but I'm fed up eating it already. I've had about half a dozen.
  • So I'll just put that down for now.
  • And don't worry about all this dead growth, this is normal.
  • This time of year our passion fruit vines die back - it's in the middle of winter
  • but I'll talk about that later - hold on, I'll use it one more time.
  • Select a variety that is true to type
  • meaning that collect the seed from a passion fruit that will come back as the parent plant.
  • Some varieties from the nursery are hybrid to improve taste
  • or grafted onto a hardy rootstock to give them better disease resistance.
  • But I prefer to find a variety that has these qualities anyway, right from seed
  • and grow them over and over again.
  • If you've ever experienced a passion fruit vine that grows vigorously but doesn't fruit
  • it could be that the rootstock has taken over the grafted plant.
  • Honestly, I wouldn't bother growing the graft varieties.
  • Simply crush the seeds right out of the dried up fruit
  • and cover with potting mix, then keep them moist and after a few weeks they will have germinated
  • and be ready for pricking out into individual pots.
  • Let them grow into small plants, and then plant them out a few feet apart.
  • Here in the subtropics, and with this type of passion fruit
  • it grows faster than hair on a mole.
  • We planted these in January 2018
  • and about 16 months later, in April 2019
  • they were already providing their first fruit.
  • And it's possible that in some locations or some other varieties
  • it could take up to three years to produce fruit.
  • Passion fruit vines don't tend to live that long either, perhaps 7 years max.
  • We generally grow ours for about 3 to 4 years, maybe 5 years max
  • because the older the vines get, the less productive they become.
  • They also get diseases like woodiness virus
  • so I recommend renewal rather than persisting with old plants.
  • Passion fruit will grow well in shaded positions
  • one of the few fruiting crops that do.
  • It also grows well in full sun
  • and this versatility makes it one of our favourite food plants to grow.
  • Tip Number Two: Strong trellis.
  • Passion fruit can become a big and heavy plant
  • especially if you're growing several vines all together on the one structure.
  • I gotta be careful here that I don't trip over a passion fruit
  • and fall flat on my face in my own YouTube video!
  • So yeah, it's important that you get the structure nice and strong
  • and as you can see here, it's got its own structure
  • and now its taken over our gourd tunnel too.
  • Our trellis here has a couple of posts that are fully cemented in
  • several other star picket posts in between
  • and attached to that is a strong wire trellising material.
  • You can grow passion fruit in a general garden
  • and it will intertwine and grow over trees
  • and even in an ornamental garden it works quite fine. We see it growing down in the scrub here
  • and also in our ornamental gardens around the property.
  • But if you want to get serious about growing a ton of passion fruit, you should really make a proper structure for it
  • and there's nothing better than a good strong trellis like this.
  • And then having a structure made of that reo mesh is perfect
  • where it can climb up and then straddle along the top
  • and then hang the fruits down.
  • Flower, fruits hanging down - makes them easier to harvest
  • and sometimes they'll just drop clean on your head
  • but it's a great way to grow passion fruit over a high structure like that
  • and just let it sprawl out with plenty of room.
  • That way it's not smothering out the rest of your garden
  • taking up valuable vegetable garden space
  • or climbing in areas such as an ornamental garden
  • where it gets targeted by animals and you can't control it as well.
  • Tip Number Three: Harvesting.
  • Oh, how convenient!
  • As I said earlier, our fruit are starting to ripen within about 16 months
  • and not all the fruit ripens at once
  • and that's a really good thing, because then you don't end up getting a whole glut of fruit.
  • So if you do need more than a few for a cake or something
  • you can save the pulp by freezing until you get enough.
  • Having said that, the end of the season, which is usually winter or mid winter here
  • the vines do tend to produce the most fruit
  • which again is good because you can harvest and eat, or store in bulk to use in the off season.
  • I must admit at times it's hard to tell if there is a season at all for passion fruits here
  • because you can go around the property all year round
  • and find a passion fruit ripening somewhere.
  • Usually a passion fruit is ready to harvest when it changes fully in colour, either to yellow or purple
  • and has a slight give when you press on the fruit.
  • You'll also often find them falling from the vine
  • and that's a key sign that they're ready to eat, even if they are looking green like this
  • or a slight shade of what they're supposed to be.
  • I probably should mention a few other points about this particular variety.
  • Don't believe the rubbish on Google that green passion fruits are poisonous, because that's not the case.
  • The reason why many of these have not ripened fully to the full yellow
  • is because A. The variety is more of a green tinge
  • B. They will ripen yellower early in the season when the weather's still warm.
  • But as the weather cools down, or if we get a really cold winter like we have now
  • passion fruits don't ripen as good.
  • But that doesn't mean they're bad. They may still be green and the fruit may be a little more sour
  • but generally the pulp is still developed inside, and perfectly good to eat.
  • But yeah if you are wondering why your passion fruits aren't ripening fully, that is the main reason.
  • The good thing is often if you leave a few of those fruits
  • that even are a bit green, on the bench for several days
  • they will ripen and get a little sweeter.
  • They may not change colour to purple or yellow
  • but they will sweeten a little, if you want to let them wait.
  • But they certainly are not poisonous!
  • Of course you don't want to be going and eating pulp that isn't ready yet, or juicy.
  • You don't want to be eating a green dry pulp - I mean that would be a bit odd, but you get what I mean.
  • You might also find that some might shrivel
  • and this shrivelling is generally a sign that it didn't quite make it.
  • Sometimes the pulp inside is alright
  • but usually the pulp inside has either not developed properly
  • or has dried up, and the fruit is then not good to eat.
  • Look I don't mean to gloat - well maybe just a little bit
  • but we grow so many of these that a few animals eating some of the fruit doesn't bother us at all
  • so we don't even try to net or keep the animals like possums away.
  • Tip Number Four: Pruning.
  • Passion fruit vines mostly die back in winter
  • or the colder months, especially where we are
  • so this is the time when we do most of our pruning.
  • In some tropical climates, it might not die back
  • and if that's the case, you still might need to prune to get rid of dead branches
  • and let that plant breathe again to prevent diseases.
  • So what I'm saying is, prune as required.
  • It won't hurt the vine, and if anything it'll encourage more growth.
  • Using this crop as an example, we initially kept it from taking over our gourd tunnel
  • by continuously pruning it back until we had enough of the gourds
  • and then we let the passion fruit vines grow for it.
  • As you can see, the passion fruits and the gourds ended up as one somehow.
  • Once all the fruits have ripened, I'll prune this whole lot completely back to stems
  • and mulch or chip it all to composting.
  • And then in spring, it'll start growing back with a vengeance
  • and we'll probably end up with as much fruit, or if not more, this next coming season.
  • It's timely that our passion fruit vines are dying off now, particularly on this trellis
  • because once they die back and then I've pruned them back
  • that'll give more sunlight and energy to our tomato plants
  • just as they are coming in to ripening.
  • Tip Number Five: Fertilising.
  • I was watching an old episode of Gardening Australia with Jane Edmondson in it
  • and she was explaining that in the old days, every passion fruit vine
  • used to have a sheep's liver or ox heart stuck in the planting hole
  • before they bung the plant in.
  • And apparently that helped with the passion fruit's growth because they loved extra iron.
  • I must admit I've never tried that
  • and I don't fertilise our passion fruit plants very often either.
  • Contrary to popular advice that states that they are a fairly hungry plant
  • I find that they grow quite well without regular fertiliser
  • and maybe that's because we grow them in good quality soil
  • which is probably more important than fertilising them regularly.
  • We get plants popping up and growing all over our property
  • and they mostly do well without any extra nutrients
  • although if positioned in a forest like area, the rich soil is likely enough.
  • Otherwise when I do fertilise, it'll be in spring at the start of the growing season
  • a few handfuls of chicken pellet manure
  • or manures that are well rotted from our own poultry pens
  • or a bit of commercial blood & bone just scattered around the base of the plants.
  • That's all. And then I probably wouldn't fertilise them again throughout the whole season.
  • Again, that does depend on the type of soil that you're growing them in.
  • Perhaps if the soil is less nutritious
  • well then maybe it might need a bit of extra fertiliser and compost throughout the growing season.
  • I wouldn't expect regular fertiliser to produce more fruit. In fact, it might do the opposite.
  • It might encourage a whole lot of growth, and less fruit.
  • So definitely don't overdo it with love.
  • So don't forget my 5 top tips:
  • True to type, Strong trellis, Harvesting, Pruning, and Fertilising.
  • Do all those things right, and you'll grow a ton of passion fruits
  • all from one passion fruit, just like I can.
  • If you liked this video, make sure you give it a big passionate thumbs up
  • and also subscribe to the channel if you haven't already.
  • Share the video around, especially if you really did like it, because other people might too
  • Thanks a lot for watching!
  • I don't think I'm going to eat any more - there's about 10 passion fruits eaten during the making of this video.
  • Bye for now!
  • They are good though.
  • I know Nina loves them, my wife.
  • Should I just finish one more off in front of you guys?
  • Hey?
  • Ooh I tell you what
  • it's really hard to beat.

Download subtitle

Description

In this video, I give you my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of passionfruit all from just one passion fruit!

Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/selfsufficientme

Help support the Channel and buy a T-shirt/Merchandise from our Spreadshirt shop: https://goo.gl/ygrXwU or Teespring (below the video).

Shop on Amazon for plants: https://bit.ly/2yRFNGQ

Shop for plants on eBay Australia: https://bit.ly/2BPCykb

Blog: http://www.selfsufficientme.com/ (use the search bar on my website to find info on certain subjects or gardening ideas)

Forum: http://www.selfsufficientculture.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SelfSufficie...

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SufficientMe

Subscribe to my channel: http://goo.gl/cpbojR

Self Sufficient Me is based on our small 3-acre property/homestead in SE Queensland Australia about 45kms north of Brisbane - the climate is subtropical (similar to Florida). I started Self Sufficient Me in 2011 as a blog website project where I document and write about backyard food growing, self-sufficiency, and urban farming in general. I love sharing my foodie and DIY adventures online so come along with me and let's get into it! Cheers, Mark :)

Trending videos